Disease and happiness seem to be great foes in the imagination of humanity. Interesting as it is to eradicate any disorder the only effective conqueror is happiness. This happiness we speak about is always looked at as something much lighter and insignificant then it is. As a matter of fact we have never once seen a truly happy person with a disease.

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At birth, the human body contains 90% water. As we age, we tend to solidify and harden. As adults our water content gradually drops to about 60% of our body weight.

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Having comrades at work can be a real lifesaver. To explore the link between job stress and heart disease, Swedish researchers electronically monitored the heartbeats of 148 working men and women, ages 23 to 61, throughout one day. The participants, who included doctors, teachers, musicians, police officers, train engineers, prison personnel and sawmill workers, also filled out a questionnaire about their work environment. Those who reported good social support on the job (friendly relations with co-workers and supervisors; a pleasant atmosphere of cooperation; few conflicts or arguments) had significantly lower heart rates – not just during working hours but at home as well, even while asleep – than did those who said they worked in chilly conditions. “The inability to unwind after work has been found to be a common effect of stress at work,” the researchers say. Because it’s hard to let go of a whole day’s worth of tension, the effect “may be so strong that even the ability to relax during sleep is influenced.” Accelerated heart rate, often a sign of stress, has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, they note.

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Robert A. Monroe, the founder of The Monroe Institute, achieved world-wide recognition as a ground-breaking visionary and explorer of human consciousness. His pioneering research, beginning in the 1950’s, led to the discovery that specific sound patterns have identifiable, beneficial effects on our capabilities. For example, certain combinations of frequencies enhance alertness; others induce sleep, promote intuitive or creative states, and still others evoke non-ordinary, expanded states of consciousness.

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All too often health-minded living foodies become ultra-focused on diets as the be all and end all. Although nutrition is an essential and powerful ally in the quest to conquer aging and disease, it alone cannot afford you complete well-rounded and stable health. During the many years I have directed the Hippocrates Health Institute and in the 70s, while heading health centers in Europe, I have been led to believe there is a multitude of contributors in creating physical and emotional strength and stamina.

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I feel overwhelmed by the changes that go with following the Hippocrates lifestyle. Do you have any helpful tips?

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More often than not, the mystics tell us to be selfless. Unfortunately, there is a little truth and a lot of problems in this thinking. When losing self, one loses meaning. Meaning is the central reason for our existence. It may be the fundamental act of procreation, the desired act of fulfilling ourselves with meaningful work, or the spectacular joy of achieving happiness in all that we do. These viable, real world happenings demand self. Without a committed conviction and achievable plan, one cannot bring about her/his inherent greatness. Selflessness should be restated as humility. In the act of achieving your own maximum benefit, it is being humble that allows it to be without ego. Anything that is achieved with maximum effort and not used as a shallow representation of who we are, is God’s work. It is only ego that creates the wedge between harmony and disharmony.

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On Thanksgiving Day 2006, we launched a project for peace here at Hippocrates. There couldn’t have been a better time and place to set such a movement in motion! With a few hundred loving and caring souls gathering on this sacred land, surrounding the lake and holding hands, we learned of a simple gesture that would contribute to the healing that is so urgently needed around the globe.

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Making life work is far easier that most of us know. There are three principals that govern our lives: physical, emotional and mental/spiritual.

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In 1975, I began to develop a vision improvement procedure that I called “open focus.” I soon realized that this method affected a lot more than vision. The technique was based on a specific aspect of human behavior that I had observed for many years – behavior that deals with the way in which we habitually approach our life experiences and consequently learn. I noticed that most people were always looking for something specific in life and that in this process they missed everything they weren’t looking for. Since it appears that most of life’s revelations occur when we are not looking for them, I began to realize that the way in which most of us were seeing was only allowing us to view, and thereby experience, a partial reality.

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Life is like a roller coaster, says Dr. Paul J. Rosch, president of the American Institute of Stress in New York.

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