Hippocrates Health Institute http://hippocratesinst.org Just another WordPress site Mon, 26 Sep 2016 17:26:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.4 Tips for Staying Raw and Vegan on the Road http://hippocratesinst.org/tips-for-staying-raw-and-vegan-on-the-road Fri, 23 Sep 2016 14:31:26 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=65117 Traveling puts most of us into unfamiliar territory. What is the best way to stay vegan and incorporate as much raw foods as possible? Reduce any stress by remembering the following: Always take your algae products and all-purpose digestive enzymes with you to fulfill basic high-octane nutritional requirements. When you buy airplane tickets, whether in person, by phone, or […]

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Traveling puts most of us into unfamiliar territory. What is the best way to stay vegan and incorporate as much raw foods as possible? Reduce any stress by remembering the following:

  1. Always take your algae products and all-purpose digestive enzymes with you to fulfill basic high-octane nutritional requirements.
  2. When you buy airplane tickets, whether in person, by phone, or online, be sure to request vegan meals. Then call 24 hours before departure to confirm fulfillment of your request. If vegan meals are not available, bring your own sprout salad or ripe fruit. Also follow this procedure when you travel by train. Most health-minded people would not consume airline food yet they raise consciousness by offering it to other passengers.
  3. When you travel by car or bus, bring a cooler loaded with fresh vegetables and sprouts. If you are on the road for days, replenish your stock with the best produce that you can find. Use local resources or the Internet to locate healthy food and dietary delights.
  4. When you travel to foreign countries, especially those in the developing world, take what nuts and seeds you can, and soak or sprout along the way. Also carry some food-grade hydrogen peroxide to help wash some pesticide residues from your vegetables and fruits. If it is not available, use vinegar as a substitute. Be sure to rinse with purified water after.

 

 

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Spa Day at HHI – October Special http://hippocratesinst.org/spa-day-at-hhi-october-special Wed, 21 Sep 2016 18:16:04 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=64917 Spend the day with us! Breast Cancer Awareness Month Special  For Breast Cancer Awareness during October we are offering a special Spa Day package for $299 that includes a 50 minute Lymph Massage, 50 minute Colonic, a fabulous raw vegan lunch and dinner, and use of our world-class facility including ozonated pools, hot and cold […]

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Spend the day with us!

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Special 

For Breast Cancer Awareness during October we are offering a special Spa Day package for $299 that includes a 50 minute Lymph Massage, 50 minute Colonic, a fabulous raw vegan lunch and dinner, and use of our world-class facility including ozonated pools, hot and cold plunge, and infrared saunas. In addition you will receive a 20% off coupon for our luxurious organic bras. Call us today to book: (561) 471-5867

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How to Get in the Flow for Better Health http://hippocratesinst.org/how-to-get-in-the-flow-for-better-health Wed, 21 Sep 2016 16:11:09 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=64896 October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it was started to increase awareness of the disease.  Most people are aware of breast cancer… but many forget to take the steps to detect it in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. Since September 26,2008 I have been giving a breast lecture every Saturday […]

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, it was started to increase awareness of the disease.  Most people are aware of breast cancer… but many forget to take the steps to detect it in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. Since September 26,2008 I have been giving a breast lecture every Saturday morning.

Educating women and men on the importance of breast health and how to manually move there breast tissue. In my lecture I also teach how to use their lymphatic system to prevent and heal.  We talk about the importance of thermography and how bras can contribute to poor breast health. Learning to massage your own breasts is easy, effective, safe, and a powerful way to enhance the health of breast tissue.

Breast tissue is made up of fat, glands, blood vessels, milk ducts, connective tissue, nerves and a lacy network of lymphatic vessels. The lymphatic fluid leaves the breast through this network of lymphatic vessels called lymph nodes. These lymph nodes are linked throughout the body and act as a major line of defense against the spread of disease in the body. When lymphatic vessels and nodes become restricted through lack of physical movement, or clothing that is too tight, the body’s defense system begins to break down and disease can set in.

Wearing a bra and not massaging our breasts daily set us up for breast health problems. Behind the breast itself is the chest wall comprised of the pectoralis muscles and the rib cage muscles, called intercostals, which assist in breathing. With tension and stress, these muscles become quite tender to the touch.

There has been research recently supporting the correlation between under wire bras and increases in breast cancer in women. The under wire, as well as a bra that fits too tight, impedes the body’s ability to move lymph through the breast tissue, as well as diminishes blood flow and nerve function. Lymphatic Drainage Massage has been proven to assist in promoting healthy breast tissue, reduce fibroids and cysts. Lymph Drainage relieves the pain and discomfort associated with PMS or from compression from bras, relieving the pain and tension from stress in the muscles of the chest wall. It assists in healthy tissue regeneration and scar reduction following surgery, and as a logical proactive step against cancer and other diseases.

Important breast actions to do each day.
1. Anywhere there is a red mark on your body from clothing, socks, shoes, rings, glasses, etc. massage those marks.
2. Wash your breasts in the shower with clock wise and counter clock wise strokes.
3. After your shower, look at yourself in the mirror. Look at your breasts from the front, sides, and back. Also bend over and look at your breasts hanging.

Important breast actions to do weekly.
Massaging your own breasts only takes about 5 – 15 minutes.
For lymphatic drainage, it takes very little pressure to move lymph through the breast tissue. Always use the pads of your fingers or your palm and work only within your comfort zone.

To begin… follow the grooves of your ribs from the sternum, beginning just below your collar bone, and move outward toward your arm pit. Your fingers will easily locate the “indents” between your ribs. In the middle is your sternum or breast bone. On either side of it you can feel the ribs and then the “valleys” between them. Place your fingertips in these valleys. Gradually shift your position working your way down the sternum, following the rib grooves out as far as is comfortable. Repeat on the other side.

Gently massage by kneading each breast, using lifting and slight compressive movements. Include moderate pressure compressions to move out the stagnant fluids from the breast.

Finishing… move the lymph from the center of your breast outward to the sides of your breast and underarm. Use the flat pads of your fingers with a broad contact to gently, but firmly, stretch the breast tissue with light to medium pressure directed away from the nipple. Visualize your breast as a pie. The outer part is the crust and you are moving the lymph to that area.

Close by applying very, very light touch to the breast, smoothing the tissue away from the nipple toward the armpit.

Article by Linda D Cloward

Lymphatic Drainage LMT #MA46425 MM#26778

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Natural Mosquito Control http://hippocratesinst.org/natural-mosquito-control Wed, 21 Sep 2016 15:13:50 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=64889 Mosquitos live in almost every part of the world. Here are a few natural and safe remedies that we use here at Hippocrates Health Institute to prevent these pesky insects that are totally non-toxic to humans and do not damage the environment: Install a bird house – a single Barn Swallow will eat up to 850 mosquitos […]

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Mosquitos live in almost every part of the world. Here are a few natural and safe remedies that we use here at Hippocrates Health Institute to prevent these pesky insects that are totally non-toxic to humans and do not damage the environment:

  • Install a bird house – a single Barn Swallow will eat up to 850 mosquitos a day.
  • Install a bat house – a single bat will eat up to 1000 mosquitos an hour or 6000 to 8000 in a single night.
  • Add Goldfish to Your Ponds – a single goldfish will consume over two hundred mosquito larvae in an hour.
  • Mosquito Dunks – this is a biological mosquito control for use in ponds. These cookie-sized pellets use beneficial bacteria to eat mosquito larvae, but is harmless to birds, fish, wildlife, and pets. Mosquito Dunks have been approved for Organic Gardening by the US EPA.

There are also a number of beneficial plants that naturally repel mosquitos that are safe and non-toxic to humans:

  • Ageratum (also known as Flossflowers)
  • Catnip (ten times more effective than DEET)
  • Citronella
  • Eucalyptus
  • Horsemint (also known as Beebalm)
  • Marigolds
  • Peppermint, spearmint, any kind of mint will do
  • Lemongrass
  • Rosemary
  • Vanilla
  • Cuban oregano

You can juice the leaves of any one of these plants in a juicer and smear the juice all over your exposed skin. Alternatively, you can simply grab a bunch of leaves and rub them hard between the palms of your hands to make a juicy pulp and then rub the pulp on your skin. You can also use essential oils derived from any one of these plants. The Hippocrates store carries a product called ‘Bugs Be Gone’ that uses essential oils of some of the plants listed above as a safe and effective defense against mosquitos.

Finally, eat your veggies! In addition to carbon dioxide, mosquitoes are attracted to lactic acid and uric acid. These are waste products secreted from your pores as a result of consuming meat, fish, chicken, and dairy products. The fact is that vegans get attacked by mosquitos less often than people who eat animals.

By Brian Hetrich, Greenhouse Manager

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Ken’s Almost Shortbread Cookies http://hippocratesinst.org/kens-almost-shortbread-cookies Wed, 21 Sep 2016 13:00:56 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=26844 In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month coming up in October we wanted to incorporate a recipe that is low in sugar and high in selenium. According to a study published by Biomed Pharmacother in 2007 selenium exhibited anti cancer potential with MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Ingredients: 3 Cups Brazil nuts, soaked overnight and rinsed 3¾–4 […]

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In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month coming up in October we wanted to incorporate a recipe that is low in sugar and high in selenium. According to a study published by Biomed Pharmacother in 2007 selenium exhibited anti cancer potential with MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

Ingredients:
3 Cups Brazil nuts, soaked overnight and rinsed
3¾–4 Cups of sliced carrots
¼ tsp cinnamon
2 tsp vanilla flavor, without alcohol
18 drops Stevia
Zest of 1 lemon
2 ounces fresh lemon juice
Method:
In a large bowl, mix all ingredients. Run the combined ingredients through a juicer using a blank screen.
Combine all again. Spread mix, about a ¼ inch thick, over a paraflex sheet and place sheet on top of a dehydrator tray. Dehydrate on the sheet for the first day at 110˚F. Then the next day, dehydrate off the sheet at the same temperature. If by the third day the cookies are thoroughly dehydrated, take off the sheet and place in a sealed container. They will last for a month or two.

It’s often been said that pastry is a science and with these no-bake cookies you will be celebrating a savvy raw vegan option that is equally delicious as it’s baked counterpart. This recipe will serve up 45 cookies that are crunchy, rich, and free from added sugar and processed fats.

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Vegan Coconut Cheese Cake http://hippocratesinst.org/coconut-cheese-cake Wed, 14 Sep 2016 18:55:56 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=64079 Just because you’re trying to avoid sugar doesn’t mean your culinary options need to be boring! Enjoy this Coconut Cheese Cake brought to you by Chef Renate Wallner of Hippocrates Health Institute. Crust: Chop very fine in food processor: 3 cups dehydrated pecans Then add: 1 T vanilla (alcohol free), 1/4 t stevia, 1 T […]

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Just because you’re trying to avoid sugar doesn’t mean your culinary options need to be boring! Enjoy this Coconut Cheese Cake brought to you by Chef Renate Wallner of Hippocrates Health Institute.

Crust:

Chop very fine in food processor:

3 cups dehydrated pecans

Then add:

1 T vanilla (alcohol free), 1/4 t stevia, 1 T water

Process until it holds together and press into cake form

Filling:

Blend until thick and creamy:

2 cups macadamia nuts (soaked)

1 cup shredded dried coconut

1 1/2 cups almond milk

1 cup coconut water

3/4 t stevia and 3 T liquid vanilla, alcohol free

blend until smooth

Stop blending and add:

3 T vegan lecithin powder and 1 cup coconut oil/melted now blend on medium until well incorporated. Pour this creamy filling into the crust. Freeze for 3 hours until firm, then keep cake in the refrigerator. Cake will keep in fridge for 5 days!

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Sugar and Your Brain http://hippocratesinst.org/sugar-and-your-brain Wed, 14 Sep 2016 18:13:11 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=64061 Did you ever wonder why children’s documented behavioral problems and learning difficulties became such an epidemic over the past few decades? Look no further than the sweeteners added to their diets, at home and at school, over that same period of time. Ever wonder why Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in general became an epidemic beginning […]

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Did you ever wonder why children’s documented behavioral problems and learning difficulties became such an epidemic over the past few decades? Look no further than the sweeteners added to their diets, at home and at school, over that same period of time.

Ever wonder why Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in general became an epidemic beginning in the 1970s? Look no further than the trend in elevated consumption levels of added sugars over that time period. How about chronic depression? Did it occur to you that ‘sugar on the brain’ could be a responsible factor in the onset of depression and a range of other psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia? If not, think again!

Medical science has learned a lot about sweeteners and the human brain in just the past few years. After neglecting the connection for so long, researchers suddenly began to wake up and see with growing distress what many of us had been warning about. In my case, 1980 marked the year that I, as Director of the Hippocrates Institute, removed all sugar, including fruit, from the diet of those people facing mental or physical challenges.

“It is alarming that commonly consumed low-cost foods with high sugar and fat contents have the potential to determine mental health,” commented the authors of a May 2012 scientific report in The Journal of Physiology, which examined the impact of added sugars, including high fructose corn syrup, on human brain function. Most disturbing is the research showing high sucrose diets can have effects on brain function transferred from mother to child in the womb. A 2014 study published in the Journal of Nutrition & Biochemistry, for instance, found learning deficits and cognition disorders in offspring born to mothers fed a diet high in sugars. Though this experiment was done with lab animals, the researchers were able to extrapolate the findings to humans with the observation it would explain many of the observed “cognition disorders in young children.”

In the British Journal of Nutrition, a team of researchers described in 2013 how they studied 40 children, aged 10 to 12 years, after they had consumed glucose beverages. Their cognitive performance, including memory and attention, was monitored each hour. Girls in particular demonstrated memory deficits, recalling fewer words on memory tests than when they just drank water. Despite the floodgates of research beginning to open on the links between sweeteners and disordered behavior, U.S. government health agencies and those of other countries remain largely behind the curve in accepting or acknowledging these links.

The normally very conservative U.S. National Library of Medicine, a part of the National Institutes of Health, did concede some of the link between added sugars and children’s behavior (hyperactivity) in a 2013 post on its website: “Refined (processed) sugars may have some effect on children’s activity. Refined sugars and carbohydrates enter the bloodstream quickly. Therefore, they cause rapid changes in blood sugar levels. This may make a child become more active.” Much of the best research on sugar and brain function has occurred outside the U.S., largely beyond the reach of influence by the U.S. food corporations, sugar production interests, and other financial concerns that try to protect their profits by keeping a lid on damaging research findings. For example, it was a research team in Denmark, at the University of Copenhagen, which found in 2014 a link between refined sugars and mood, not just in children but in adults.

Similarly, it was scientists from Serbia, at the University of Belgrade, who published the results of a study showing how high fructose diets produce brain problems, in particular cognitive deficits. Interestingly, it was a joint French/American team of researchers in 2013 that made a finding about how the spice cinnamon could be used to counteract the memory impairment and other Alzheimer-associated brain changes coming from consumption of high fructose food and beverages.

Evidence: Alzheimer’s Disease & the Role of Sugars

“Preventing or postponing the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and delaying or slowing its progression would lead to a consequent improvement of health status and quality of life in older age. Poorer cognitive function and an increased risk of vascular dementia were found to be associated with consumption of milk or dairy products, and a diet high in added sugars.” Diet and Alzheimer’s disease risk factors or prevention: the current evidence. Solfrizzi V. Et al. Exp Rev Neurotherapeutics. 2011 May;11(5):677–708.

“Intake of saturated fats and simple carbohydrates (glucose and sucrose), two of the primary components of a modern Western diet, is linked with the development of obesity and Alzheimer’s disease. Evidence shows that consumption of a meal containing simple carbohydrates can impair postprandial memory function. It was found that the high glycemic meal led to poorer performance in memory tests given between1-2 hours after eating.”

Western Diet Consumption and Cognitive Impairment: Links to Hippocampal Dysfunction and Obesity. Kanoski SE. Davidson TL. Physiol Behav. 2011 Apr 18;103(1):59–68.

Behavioral Problems in Children

“Hyperactivity is a very common disorder in children, especially males. Chocolate, sugar, sweeteners, additives, preservatives, dyes, can enhance an incidence of this syndrome.”

Attention deficit and infantile hyperactivity. Berdonces JL. Rev Enferm (Spanish). 2001 Jan;24(1):11–4.

“Eating simple sugars has been suggested as having adverse behavioral and cognitive effects in children. This study was performed to address a physiologic mechanism for this effect. Metabolic, hormonal and symptomatic responses to a standard oral glucose load were compared in 25 healthy children and 23 young adults. Enhanced adrenomedullary responses to modest reductions in plasma glucose concentration and increased susceptibility to neuroglycopenia may be important contributing factors to adverse behavioral and cognitive effects after sugar ingestion in healthy children.”

Enhanced adrenomedullary response and increased susceptibility to neuroglycopenia: mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of sugar ingestion in healthy children. Jone TW, et al. J Pediatr. 1995 Feb;126(2):171–7.

“The meta-analysis of the studies to date found that sugar does not affect the behavior or cognitive performance of children. The strong belief of parents may be due to expectancy and common association. However, a small effect of sugar or effects on subsets of children cannot be ruled out.”

The effect of sugar on behavior or cognition in children. A meta-analysis. Wolraich ML, et al. JAMA. 1995 Nov 22–29;274(20):1617–21.

“On separate mornings each child among eight preschool children received 6 ounces of juice, sweetened on one morning with sucrose and on the other with an artificial sweetener. Following the sucrose drink the children showed a decrement in performance in the structured testing situation and they demonstrated more ‘inappropriate’ behavior during free play. These differences in behavior were most pronounced approximately 45 to 60 minutes after the drinks.”

Behavioral effects of sucrose on preschool children. Goldman JA, et al. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 1986 Dec;14(4):565–77.

Brain Function & Memory Problems

“High fructose diet has been shown to have damaging effects on the hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Fructose induced hippocampal dysfunction may arise from insulin resistance and inflammation. Our results showed that long-term consumption of 10% fructose solution induces hippocampal insulin resistance and inflammation. Rats fed with higher concentrations of fructose displayed impaired plastic responses of the hippocampus which may provide a basis for cognitive deficits.”

The impact of different fructose loads on insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and PSA-NCAM-mediated plasticity in the hippocampus of fructose-fed male rats. Djordjevic A. Et al. Nutr Neurosci. 2015 Feb;18(2):66–75.

“The hippocampus plays a crucial role in learning and memory, and neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus contributes to learning deficits. This study determined the influence of maternal high sucrose diets on behavior and hippocampal neurons in the young offspring. The results demonstrated that prenatal high sucrose diets could induce the spatial acquisition deficits in the young offspring associated with hippocampal apoptosis and might play a critical role in cognition disorders in young children.”

Hippocampal apoptosis involved in learning deficits in the offspring exposed to maternal high sucrose diets. Kuang H. Et al. J Nutr Biochem. 2014 Sep;25(9):985–90.

“Here we examined the effects of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup intake during adolescence or adulthood on cognitive and metabolic outcomes. Adolescent or adult male rats were given 30-day access to chow containing either water, sucrose solution, or HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) solution. These data show that consumption of added sugars, particularly HFCS, negatively impacts hippocampal function, metabolic outcomes, and neuroinflammation.”

Effects of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup consumption on spatial memory function and hippocampal neuroinflammation in adolescent rats. Hsu TM. Et al. Hippocampus. 2014 Sep 20. {Epub ahead of print.}

“A total of 40 children (10–12 years) completed a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial, receiving three isoenergetic drinks, including a glucose beverage. For three hours post-consumption, subjective appetite and cognitive performance (speed of processing, memory, attention and perceptual speed) were measured hourly.” After consuming the glucose drink girls demonstrated less word recall with short-term memory deficits.

The effect of beverages varying in glycaemic load on postprandial glucose responses, appetite and cognition in 10-12 year old school children. Brindal E. Et al. Br J Nutr. 2013 Aug 28;110(3):529–37.

“Overall dietary energy intake, particularly the consumption of simple sugars such as fructose, has been increasing steadily in Western societies, but the effects on the brain are poorly understood. Here, we used functional and structural assays to characterize the effects of excessive caloric intake on the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory. Rats fed with a high-fat, high-glucose diet supplemented with high-fructose corn syrup showed alterations in energy and lipid metabolism similar to clinical diabetes, with elevated fasting glucose and increased cholesterol and triglycerides. Rats maintained on this diet for 8 months exhibited impaired spatial learning ability, reduced hippocampal dendritic spine density, and reduced long-term potentiation at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. We conclude that a high calorie diet reduces hippocampal synaptic plasticity and impairs cognitive function.”

Diet-induced insulin resistance impairs hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognition in middle-aged rats. Stranahan AM, et al. Hippocampus. 2008;18(11):1085–8.

“We have investigated a potential mechanism by which a diet, similar in composition to the typical diet of most industrialized western societies rich in saturated fat and refined sugar, can influence brain structure and function via regulation of neurotrophins. Our results indicate that a popularly consumed diet can influence crucial aspects of neuronal and behavioral plasticity associated with the function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.”

A high-fat, refined sugar diet reduces hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neuronal plasticity, and learning. Molteni R, et al. Neuroscience. 2002;112(4):803–14.

Depression

“Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease in the Western World. A western diet high in saturated fat and refined sugar seems to play an important part in disease development. Our study with 42 mice randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets—a high fat, a high sucrose, or a control diet—for 13 weeks showed that dietary fat and sucrose affect behavior.”

A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice. Pyndt Jorgensen B. Et al. PLoS One. 2014 Aug 18;9(8):e103398.

“Key biological factors that influence the development of depression are modified by diet This study examined the extent to which the high-prevalence mental disorders are related to habitual diet in 1,046 women ages 20-93 years randomly selected from the population. A “western” diet of processed or fried foods, refined grains, sugary products, and beer was associated with higher odds for major depression and anxiety disorders. These results demonstrate an association between habitual diet quality and the high prevalence mental disorders.”

Association of Western and traditional diets with depression and anxiety in women. Jacka FN, et al. Am J Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;167(3):305–11.

Schizophrenia

“A higher national dietary intake of refined sugar and dairy products predicted a worse 2-year outcome of schizophrenia. A high national prevalence of depression was predicted by a lower dietary intake of fish and seafood. The dietary predictors of outcome of schizophrenia and prevalence of depression are similar to those that predict illnesses such as coronary heart disease and diabetes, which are more common in people with mental health problems.” International variations in the outcome of schizophrenia and the prevalence of depression in relation to national dietary practices: an ecological analysis. Peet M. Br J Psychiatry. 2004 May;184:404–8.

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Superfood Spotlight: Baobab http://hippocratesinst.org/superfood-spotlight-baobab Tue, 13 Sep 2016 19:18:32 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=63969 The Baobab is a beautiful rare tropical exotic tree native to Madagascar, Africa, and Australia. It has been called the Tree of Life for its almost mythical powers that some cultures attach to it. The massive trunk of the Baobab holds large amounts of water. Upon maturity the tree commonly grows thirty feet in diameter […]

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The Baobab is a beautiful rare tropical exotic tree native to Madagascar, Africa, and Australia. It has been called the Tree of Life for its almost mythical powers that some cultures attach to it. The massive trunk of the Baobab holds large amounts of water. Upon maturity the tree commonly grows thirty feet in diameter and up to ninety feet tall. During periods of drought elephants have been known to rub their hide against the tree which releases some of the water which they can then drink. Baobab trees commonly live a very long time – some up to 6000 years! Some people say the tree does not become handsome until it becomes at least 500 years old.

Baobab flowers are night-blooming and are pollinated by bats. The fruit of the tree and boasts:

  • 6 x Antioxidants of Blueberries
  • 6 x Vitamin C of Oranges
  • 6 x Potassium of Bananas
  • More Magnesium Than Coconut Water
  • Twice As Much Calcium as Milk

The tree is deciduous meaning it sheds its leaves annually. Because of its relatively small leaf canopy and extremely tall and massive trunk it is also known as the “upside down tree.” Legend says because the fruit was not sweet enough that God became angry with the tree and pulled it out of the ground and put it back turning it upside down!

Here at Hippocrates Health Institute we have two young Baobab specimen trees. The leaves of the tree are a succulent edible meaning they are tender and juicy. We sometimes serve the Baobab leaves on the buffet to our guests as they can be used like a leafy green when making salads. We have hundreds of varieties of rare exotic trees on our beautiful immaculately manicured fifty acre tropical oasis campus. Why not make your next vacation a healthy, happy and educational destination by visiting us here at Hippocrates Health Institute?

By Brian Hetrich Greenhouse Manager at Hippocrates Health Institute

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The Sugar Timeline http://hippocratesinst.org/the-sugar-timeline Fri, 09 Sep 2016 15:44:25 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=63550 Sugar is an umbrella term for sweetness in its many forms—cane sugar, beet sugar, honey, molasses, fruit juice concentrate, maple syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, agave nectar, among the many naturally-occurring and synthetically-derived sweeteners known to humans. In early recorded history it was mostly a sweetener experience dominated by sugar cane and honey, and that is where our story begins. 8,000 BC—It is […]

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Sugar is an umbrella term for sweetness in its many forms—cane sugar, beet sugar, honey, molasses, fruit juice concentrate, maple syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, agave nectar, among the many naturally-occurring and synthetically-derived sweeteners known to humans. In early recorded history it was mostly a sweetener experience dominated by sugar cane and honey, and that is where our story begins.

8,000 BC—It is conjectured that sugar cane was first domesticated in New Guinea and its cultivation then spread to Southeast Asia, China, and then beyond.

2,400 BC—Earliest evidence of beekeeping in hives to collect honey for honey cakes found at a religious temple near present day Cairo, Egypt.

350 AD—Sugarcane growers in India discover and master how to crystallize sugar using a boiling process of refining cane juice.

11th Century—British and French Christian crusaders encounter sugar from sugar cane grown by Arabs and bring back this ‘new spice’ to their own lands where it becomes an expensive delicacy for the rich and nobility.

1319—A kilo of sugar (known as ‘white gold’) goes for two shillings a pound in London, the equivalent of about $50 a pound in current dollars, keeping it a luxury item that few people below the richest class will experience in a lifetime.

1493—On his second voyage to the ‘new’ world of the Americas, Christopher Columbus brings along sugar cane plant seedlings for planting in the Caribbean islands of Hispaniola, where the warm climate is conducive for growth of the plant, giving rise to the sugar cane industry.

16th Century—Native Americans are enslaved by Europeans throughout the Caribbean islands, particularly Barbados and Jamaica, and in Central and South America, as labor to harvest sugar cane. When their numbers become depleted by disease and harsh working conditions, African slaves are shipped in to take their place in the fields and processing operations. Millions will die in the sugar cane fields from the brutal labor, lack of medical care, or in attempting to escape imprisonment.

1700—An average person in Britain consumes four pounds of sugar a year; that amount will gradually increase as the price of sugar falls due to overproduction in the Americas, making it affordable for the middle class and poor.

1747—Sugar beets are identified as a new source of commercial sugar. This new source further drives down world prices and makes sugar more affordable to generations of lower and middle class people never exposed to it before. Sugar is being added to jams, candy, tea, coffee, and many other food items.

1800—A French medical student identifies the first series of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, a condition characterized by the body’s own immune system attacking joint linings and cartilage. Two centuries later medical research will link sugar consumption as a cause of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

1807—By the time Britain bans slave trading in this year, at least six million African slaves have been incarcerated on sugar cane plantations.

1870—The average resident of Britain consumes 47 pounds of sugar a year.

1880—Cheaper sugar beets now replace sugar cane as the principal sugar source for Europeans.

1890—Indentured servants now eclipse slaves as the primary work force worldwide growing and processing sugar. An estimated 450,000 indentured servants, most serving ten years or more in servitude, are moved around the world, most to Fiji, Hawaii, and Australia. Once indentured servitude ends in the early 20th Century, sugar production remains an industry characterized by meager wages and workers living in harsh working conditions and extreme poverty.

1900—The average Briton now eats about 100 pounds of sugar annually; the average American consumes 40 pounds.

1906—A German physician, Dr. Alzheimer, first identifies a form of dementia characterized by dramatic shrinkage Sugar’s Sordid Timeline History 21 in brain nerve cells. By the end of the 20th century, an estimated 5 million Americans a year will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

1910—A medical explanation emerges in the U.S. for the rising rates of diabetes: the pancreas of a diabetes patient was unable to produce what {is} termed “insulin,” a chemical the body uses to break down sugar. Thus, excess sugar ended up in the urine.

1962—An estimated 13% of American adults meet the criteria for obesity.

1967—A Japanese scientist invents a cost-effective industrial process for using enzymes to convert glucose in cornstarch to fructose. High Fructose Corn Syrup derived from corn becomes a cheap alternative sweetener to sugar.

1975—In the U.S. 400 new cases of cancer occur for every 100,000 people.

1984—Soft drink manufacturers such as Pepsi and Coca-Cola switch from sugar to the cheaper high-fructose corn syrup in U.S. production facilities.

1992—Cancer rates have climbed to 510 new cases for every 100,000 people in the U.S.

1997—An estimated 19.4% of U.S. adults meet criteria for obesity.

2004—Obesity now affects 24.5% of U.S. adults.

2005—Each U.S. citizen eats about 100 pounds of added sugars each year, up from about 40 pounds in 1900.

2008—An ordinary American now consumes 37.8 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup every year, mostly unknowingly because it is laced in thousands of processed food and drink products. It is considered one of the ‘hidden’ sweeteners because, like many sugars and artificial sweeteners, it uses numerous chemical aliases making it difficult to identify on food label ingredient lists.

2008—The obesity rate for adult Americans reaches 32.2% of men and 35.5% of women. Obesity is considered a contributing factor to the deaths of nearly 400,000 Americans annually.

2009—The American Heart Association issues health recommendations that women consume no more than six teaspoons per day of sugars and men consume no more than nine teaspoons a day. Generally both men and women consume three times that amount daily.

2015—The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, which meets every five years to issue dietary recommendations to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, advises for the first time that American consumers dramatically cut back on the amount of added sugars to 12 teaspoons a day, half of what Americans currently consume. Much of these added sugars are derived from consumption of juices, sodas and a wide range of sugary drinks.

References:

“A Brief History of Honey.” The Honey Association. http://www.honeyassociation. com/index.asp?pid=9

A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World.  William Bernstein. 2009. London: Atlantic Books.

“Adult Obesity Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. Statistics. http://www.alzfdn.org/AboutAlzheimers/statistics.html

“Cancer Statistics.” NIH Fact Sheets. National Institutes of Health. http://report.nih.gov/nihfactsheets/viewfactsheet.aspx?csid=75

“Cancer Trends During the 20th Century.” Journal of Australian College of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine. Vol. 21, No. 1. April 2002.

“Diabetes Public Health Resource.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics/prev/national/figbyage.htm

Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association . Circulation, 120:1011–1020.

“History of Type 2 Diabetes.” Healthline. April, 2013. http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/history-type-2-diabetes#3

“How Sugar is Made—the History.” http://www.sucrose.com/Ihist.html

“Is sugar the missing link in RA? Weissmann G. Internal Medicine News. 2006;39(16):11.

“Major Milestones in Alzheimer’s Research.” Alzheimer’s Association. http://www.alz.org/research/science/major_milestones_in_alzheimers.asp

“Periodontitis Health Guide.” The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/periodontitis/risk-factors.html

“Processed Food: A 2-Million-Year History.” Scientific American .Vol. 309, Issue 3. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/processed-food-a-two-million-year-history/

“Sugar Consumption in the US Diet between 1822 and 2005.” Guyenet,Stephan & Landen, Jeremy. Online Statistics, Rice University andTufts University. http://onlinestatbook.com/2/case_studies/sugar.html

“Sugar Love.” Rich Cohen. National Geographic. August, 2013.

“Sugar and Sweeteners.” Anderson J. & Young L. Colorado StateUniversity, Fact Sheet No. 9.301. Food and Nutrition Series. Revised May 2010.

“The Real Bad Egg Is Sugar.” The New York Times . Feb. 19, 2015.196 References

The Sugar Barons: Family, Corruption, Empire and War.  Matthew Parker. 2011. London: Hutchinson.

“Why Did Thematoid Arthritis Begin in 1800?” Richard S. Panush, M.D. The Rheumatologist . Sept. 2012. http://www.the-rheumatologist.org/details/article/2543901/Why_Did_Rheumatoid_Arthritis_Begin_in_1800.html

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How to Grow the Sweetest Tasting Wheatgrass http://hippocratesinst.org/how-to-grow-the-sweetest-tasting-wheatgrass Wed, 07 Sep 2016 19:29:25 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=63274 While wheatgrass juice has many powerful medicinal properties, it may taste sweet to some people while it may taste bitter to others. The way you perceive the taste depends upon your history – how much you exercise, how healthy you have recently been eating, and how many toxins you have been exposed to in your […]

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While wheatgrass juice has many powerful medicinal properties, it may taste sweet to some people while it may taste bitter to others. The way you perceive the taste depends upon your history – how much you exercise, how healthy you have recently been eating, and how many toxins you have been exposed to in your past. In general, the more nauseous it makes you the more you need it. This nauseous feeling is due to the powerful detoxifying effect of wheatgrass juice.

The secret is to sip it slowly on an empty stomach. Take a small sip, hold it in your mouth for thirty seconds, swish it around under your tongue and then swallow. This allows the wheatgrass juice to mix with your saliva which predigests the juice and makes it go down more easily. This also allow the nutrients in the wheatgrass juice to be absorbed directly into your bloodstream under your tongue. Take another small sip and follow the same procedure until you have finished two ounces. Drinking two ounces twice a day in this manner is ideal for optimal health.

Not all wheatgrass juice will taste the same. The difference in taste will vary depending upon how you grow it. In order to grow the sweetest tasting wheatgrass you will need to observe these three rules:

  1. Harvest the entire tray at the beginning of the jointing stage, or sooner on day seven or eight. The jointing stage is a botanical term for when the grass is graduating from a baby to an adult. It occurs 12 to 21 days after planting. This is when the grass is the sweetest, when it is the most tender and when it is the most nutritious. The older it gets the more bitter it gets. Kind of like usJ! But, every day the wheatgrass grows past the jointing stage it ages 40 years!
  2. You need plenty of indirect sunlight and plenty of artificial light to supplement for cloudy days. But, no direct sunlight, ever. If you grow in direct sunlight your grass will get more bitter.
  3. Your cut wheatgrass will last in the refrigerator for up to five days but, fresh is always best. Grow in small trays so you have less cut wheatgrass in the refrigerator for a shorter period of time. You must drink the wheatgrass fresh – within 15 minutes of juicing to get the maximum benefit.

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