Hippocrates Health Institute http://hippocratesinst.org Just another WordPress site Fri, 31 Jul 2015 08:50:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Santa Fe Spinach Salad http://hippocratesinst.org/santa-fe-spinach-salad http://hippocratesinst.org/santa-fe-spinach-salad#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:39:33 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=5364 A delicious summer recipe reminiscent of a warm summer night in Santa Fe. Enjoy! Taco “Meat” 3 C. Walnuts (soaked and dehydrated) 1-2 Cloves Garlic 2 T. Chili Powder ¼ Tsp. Cayenne 1 Tsp. Braggs Aminos (optional) 1. In a food processor, combine all ingredients 2. Process by pulsing until desired texture is achieved 3. […]

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A delicious summer recipe reminiscent of a warm summer night in Santa Fe. Enjoy!

Taco “Meat”
3 C. Walnuts (soaked and dehydrated)
1-2 Cloves Garlic
2 T. Chili Powder
¼ Tsp. Cayenne
1 Tsp. Braggs Aminos (optional)
1. In a food processor, combine all ingredients
2. Process by pulsing until desired texture is achieved
3. Season to Taste
4. Dehydrate overnight for salad
Red Pepper Tahini Dressing
2 Red Bell Peppers, Roughly Chopped
1 C. Raw Sesame Tahini
1 C. Water
1-2 Cloves Garlic
1 T. Frontier Pizza Seasoning
1 T. Fresh Lemon Juice
2-3 Drops Liquid Stevia Extract
Braggs Aminos, Dulse, or Kelp Granules to Taste
1. In a blender, combine all ingredients
2. Blend well and season to taste
3. Add more water to adjust consistency

To Make the Salad:
Combine Spinach and chopped onions in a bowl, dress with the Red Pepper Tahini Dressing. Sprinkle dehydrated Taco “Meat” on top! Remember it is always important that your ingredients be organic, especially spinach!

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Why Buy Organic Food? http://hippocratesinst.org/why-buy-organic-food http://hippocratesinst.org/why-buy-organic-food#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:06:38 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=5352 Organic food usually (but, not always) costs more than conventional groceries. Is it really worth it to spend the extra money for organic? Of course, my answer is a very predictable and emphatic, “YES!” Allow me to explain three very important reasons why I feel this way. 1. By Eating Organic Food You Reduce Your […]

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Organic food usually (but, not always) costs more than conventional groceries. Is it really worth it to spend the extra money for organic? Of course, my answer is a very predictable and emphatic, “YES!” Allow me to explain three very important reasons why I feel this way.

1. By Eating Organic Food You Reduce Your Exposure to Toxic Chemicals

Today’s crops are heavily sprayed with a chemical cocktail of synthesized pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, and fertilizers. Some of these chemicals are highly toxic to humans and have a very long half-life. For example, DDT was banned from use in the USA in 1972 yet, this very dangerous pesticide is still showing up today in the placenta of birthing mothers. Girls exposed to DDT before puberty are 5 times more likely to develop breast cancer in middle age, according to the President’s Cancer Panel. This is just one of the 85,000 chemicals we humans have created in the last 150 years that now pollute our environment.

The practice of spraying crops with artificial chemicals upsets the balance of the natural ecosystem. Crops treated this way become increasingly dependent on these artificial substances which weakens the plant’s natural growth and defense mechanisms. Crops grown organically use only natural methods and products for fertilization, pest control, fungus control, and weed suppression which are harmless to humans without the use of any chemically synthesized pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, or fertilizers.

2. There is More Nutrition in Organic Produce

Because of several generations of unstainable farming practices, the topsoil on most factory farms has been depleted of minerals. Most of the food that is mass distributed for commercial consumption is grown on life support primarily of just three minerals: nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus (NPK.) These three nutrients are the most important ones because these are what make the plants jump up fast so farmers can turn around the quickest profit. But, where is the iron, the calcium, the magnesium, zinc, copper, and any one of the other 92 minerals we humans need for good health? If they are missing from the soil, they will be missing in the plants. If they are missing from the plants they will be missing in you!

Not only is the soil mostly depleted on factory farms but, plants fed high concentrations of nitrogen grow too fast before they are harvested. They are not given the time needed to uptake whatever few minerals may still be present in the soil. According to a UCLA study conducted on iron in spinach it was concluded that you would have to eat 43 bowls of spinach in 1997 to equal just 1 bowl in 1953! Not only was the spinach deficient in iron, but other minerals as well. As a consequence, when you do not have minerals sufficient, the body cannot use the vitamins. The best organic farming practices focus on more sustainable growing methods such as composting, crop rotation, rock dust, permaculture, and other methods that all help to restore and preserve the minerals in the soil. These types of practices produce more mineral rich crops.

Phytonutrients such as chlorophyll, beta-carotene, and lycopene are natural defense substances that plants produce to help protect themselves in nature from germs, fungi, bugs, and disease Organic fruits and vegetables have far more phytonutrients than nonorganic plants. This is because nonorganic plants become dependent upon the artificial, chemically-synthesized pesticides and fungicides farmers spray on them to help them grow. Consequently, the plants stop producing many of the antibodies needed to naturally deal with these challenges. Phytonutrients are also very sensitive to heat and are destroyed by the cooking process. Therefore fresh, ripe, raw, organic, and whole fruits, vegetables, and sprouts are the best source of these powerful defenders for your immune system.

3. Buying Organic Food Helps You to Avoid Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s)

The practice of creating GMO’s in food involves injecting the DNA of one species into the DNA of another species in an effort to develop certain characteristics. For example, the DNA of fungus, mold, bacteria, viruses, fish, humans, and jellyfish have been injected into corn, potatoes, and strawberries in an effort to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, this genetic manipulation creates unintended consequences in our food such as twisted proteins and twisted carbohydrates and other toxins. GMO’s have been linked to serious health challenges such as a weakened immune system, autoimmune diseases, food allergies, gastrointestinal problems, childhood learning disorders, leaky gut syndrome, autism, and cancer.

The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) recently released its position paper on Genetically Modified foods stating that “GM foods pose a serious health risk” and calling for a moratorium on GM foods. Citing several animal studies, the AAEM concludes “there is more than a casual association between GM foods and adverse health effects” and that “GM foods pose a serious health risk in the areas of toxicology, allergy and immune function, reproductive health, and metabolic, physiologic and genetic health.”

Twenty six countries outside of the USA have already banned GMO’s at least partially, thanks to much more balanced media reporting on this topic in those regions of the world. Monsanto and other large corporations who stand to make enormous profits have invested heavily in false advertising and political lobbyists to influence government policy and the public’s perception on GMO’s.

The most common GMO foods in this country are conventional corn, soy, canola, sugar beets, Hawaiian papaya, zucchini, and yellow squash or any processed products containing any one of these foods. Your best defense to avoid GMO’s in the USA is to eat only organic food. According to the USDA, the use of GMO’s is prohibited in organic products. This means an organic farmer can’t plant GMO seeds, an organic cow can’t eat GMO alfalfa or corn, and an organic soup producer can’t use any GMO ingredients. To meet the USDA organic regulations, farmers and processors must show they aren’t using GMOs and that they are protecting their products from contact with prohibited substances, such as GMOs, from farm to table. You should also look for products that have the “Non-GMO Project Verified” label.

Conclusion

The purity of the “Organic” label on commercially distributed food has been somewhat diluted in the last few years. Still, it is better to eat organic than eating conventional food that we know is laced with toxic chemicals. Sometimes, it comes down to making the best choice of the options available to you. The best practice is to grow your own food so you know exactly how your food has been grown.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes a list of the top twelve crops with the highest pesticide load called the “The Dirty Dozen.” These foods should only be eaten when they are grown organically:

The Dirty Dozen
• Apples
• Strawberries and blueberries
• Grapes
• Celery
• Peaches
• Spinach
• Sweet bell peppers
• Nectarines
• Cucumbers
• Cherry tomatoes
• Snap peas
• Potatoes

Plus, I would also suggest avoiding the following seven foods unless they are USDA certified organic in an effort to avoid GMO’s:

• Corn
• Soy
• Canola
• Sugar beets
• Hawaiian papaya
• Zucchini
• Yellow squash

The following list of foods are the least likely to hold pesticide residues:

• Avocados
• Pineapples
• Cabbage
• Sweet peas (frozen)
• Onions
• Asparagus
• Mangoes
• Kiwi
• Eggplant
• Grapefruit
• Cantaloupe (domestic)
• Cauliflower
• Sweet potatoes

By Brian Hetrich CNC, ND
Greenhouse Manager

Brian Hetrich is responsible for growing all the wheatgrass, sprouts, herbs, fruits, and vegetables at Hippocrates Health Institute. Brian is a key part of the Hippocrates educational experience for guests at the institute. His classes teach Life Transformation Program and Health Educator Program participants essential information including: growing sprouts and wheatgrass, juicing, organic gardening, and water purification.
Brian came to Hippocrates Health Institute from Maryland, where he hosted raw food retreats and ran a successful private practice. He is a Certified Nutritional Counselor (CNC) and earned his Doctorate of Naturopathy from the International Institute of Original Medicine (IIOM.) IIOM is accredited by the American Naturopathic Medical Accreditation Board (ANMAB), and the American Association of Drugless Practitioners (AADP.) Brian is also a raw food chef and teaches classes on gourmet raw cuisine. He is co-author of the book, “Natural Vibrant Health – Raw Foods” which is a collection of his favorite raw food recipes. Brian’s book is available in the Hippocrates store.

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Cold Carrot-Almond Soup http://hippocratesinst.org/cold-carrot-almond-soup http://hippocratesinst.org/cold-carrot-almond-soup#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 19:51:25 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=5065 Yield: 2 to 3 servings This is a sweet and satisfying treat that is sure to please your taste buds. 1 cup raw almonds, soaked 12 hours 3 cups fresh carrot juice 1 red or yellow bell pepper, coarsely chopped 1 garlic clove 1/2 bunch dill, parsley, basil, or cilantro Bragg Liquid Aminos, kelp powder, […]

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Yield: 2 to 3 servings
This is a sweet and satisfying treat that is sure to please your taste buds.

1 cup raw almonds, soaked 12 hours
3 cups fresh carrot juice
1 red or yellow bell pepper, coarsely chopped
1 garlic clove
1/2 bunch dill, parsley, basil, or cilantro
Bragg Liquid Aminos, kelp powder, or dulse granules

Drain and rinse the almonds. Transfer to a blender along with the carrot juice, bell pepper, and garlic, and process until smooth. Add the dill and process again. Season with Bragg Liquid Aminos to taste.

Variation
Instead of almonds, use 1/2 cup raw pine nuts, soaked 12 hours.

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Okra http://hippocratesinst.org/okra-2 http://hippocratesinst.org/okra-2#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 18:59:04 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=5071 Okra is well known as a blood sugar balancer which makes it a very powerful tool for diabetes. Less well known are okra’s anti-cancer benefits. Studies on okra’s effect on cancer have shown that: • Okra kills 72% of human breast cancer cells in vitro • Okra pectin inhibits 75% of highly metastatic melanoma cells […]

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Okra is well known as a blood sugar balancer which makes it a very powerful tool for diabetes. Less well known are okra’s anti-cancer benefits. Studies on okra’s effect on cancer have shown that:

• Okra kills 72% of human breast cancer cells in vitro
• Okra pectin inhibits 75% of highly metastatic melanoma cells in vitro
• Men who eat okra have 40% less prostate cancer

Okra is a hot weather plant and grows well in Southern Florida. Here at the Hippocrates Health Institute we harvest plenty of freshly-picked okra every day this time of year and deliver it straight to the kitchen for the ultimate farm-to-table experience for our guests.

Wait until the weather is warm to set out your plants. Plants like it when nights are at least in the 60s and days 85 or warmer. Soak your okra seeds overnight for the best germination. Choose a sunny location and plant the seeds in fertile, well-drained soil about 1/2 to 1 inch deep and 12 to 18 inches apart.

Water right away and continue watering once a day on those days it does not rain. Once every two weeks.
fertilize with compost tea or side-dress each plant with compost. Warm weather helps pods grow quickly, so check plants every day once they start producing. A pod can grow from nothing to full size in 2 or 3 days. Pods first appear at the base of the plant up so that by the end of the season you could be on your tiptoes to harvest.

Pods are ideal when 2 to 4 inches long; they get very tough and stringy if allowed to stay on the plant. Always remove any that are too big to eat because they keep the plant from producing. Use pruning shears to cut the pods with a short stub of stem attached. Okra is best eaten raw as many of the health-giving nutrients are heat sensitive.

Hippocrates Okra

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From the HHI Store – Permacharts http://hippocratesinst.org/from-the-hhi-store-permacharts http://hippocratesinst.org/from-the-hhi-store-permacharts#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:31:37 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=5036 Permacharts are 4 sided laminated charts packed with information regarding the Hippocrates Health Institute Lifestyle. The topics include Food Combining, Juicing, Dehydration, Detox, Storing Goods, and more. They are perfect for people new to the Raw Vegan Foods Lifestyle, as well as those who have been eating raw for years. Use Coupon Code Perma20 to […]

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Permacharts are 4 sided laminated charts packed with information regarding the Hippocrates Health Institute Lifestyle. The topics include Food Combining, Juicing, Dehydration, Detox, Storing Goods, and more. They are perfect for people new to the Raw Vegan Foods Lifestyle, as well as those who have been eating raw for years.

Use Coupon Code Perma20 to get 20% off on each PermaChart you purchase.
Coupon Good from July 23-July 31, cannot be combined with any other offer.

Food Combining -The reader will have a better idea of which foods to eat and when for proper digestion and elimination.  The ideal diet, golden rules, principles of food combining, enzymes, fasting, and planning a diet are included…plus more!

Detoxification – Learn how detoxifying the body works, how it will affect you, a healthy colon VS a distressed colon, how to use the toilet properly, Enema and Implants, regeneration, and tips to maintain optimal colon health.

How To Store Goods –Readers receive a guide to selecting produce and how to quick-ripen it, pointers on food handling and storage, and handy charts to help take the mystery out of fresh, raw food usage.    Proper selection and storage will preserve beneficial nutrients and help make fresh produce last longer.  Buying locally and in season saves money and results in optimal taste.

Juicing- In Juicing, readers are provided with a guide to understanding why consuming fresh, raw juice is beneficial for everyone!  Included in this chart are juicing and consumption guidelines, juicer comparisons, and frequently asked questions.  Therapeutic uses for specific foods, green juices, and food sources for various nutrients are described.  Several health-enhancing juice recipes are included along with a guide to an ideal one day juice fast.

Raw Foods Dehydration- In Raw Foods Dehydration, readers are introduced to the concept of dehydration for raw food purposes, why and how it is practiced, and tips for using a dehydrator.  Recipes and procedures for dehydrated preparations are included.

LifeStyle-  The perfect guide to better explain the Raw Food/Vegan lifestyle, diet, and exercise regimen.   By reading this LifeStyle permachart you will better understand Raw Foods Vegetarianism, Vegan Vegetarian Ism, Enzymes, Living Foods, Skin Brushing, Toxins, and blood information.

Superfoods- While a raw food plant-based diet remains ideal, Superfoods are a remarkable dietary addition to ensure that the full nutrient spectrum is available in optimal amounts.  In Superfoods, readers are introduced to the Superfoods concept and why they are beneficial, along with general Superfoods categories.  A guide to understanding the potential benefits of Superfoods, a power-packed recipe, and a useful “Buyer Beware” section help too.

In The Raw Kitchen- In The Raw Kitchen guide, readers have a definitive guide to a vegetarian shopping complete with check lists and storage tips.  This chart includes helpful “organic food” information; organic food definitions, and how to ensure that you are buying true organic products.  The recommended equipment used to sustain a raw food vegetarian lifestyle is also described.

Wheatgrass Juice, Green Drinks, and Sprouts- This particular Permachart on WheatGrass Juice, Green Drinks, and Sprouts will cover all of your need-to-know benefits of juicing greens, growing wheatgrass, and helpful tips and tricks!  One of the major benefits of this permachart is the helpful guide listed on the back explaining detailed information on Seed Type, Nutritional Benefits, Dry Measure, Soaking Time, Sprouting Time, Yield, and Harvest Length—with room to fill in your own information about your seeds, too!

To Purchase Permacharts Click Here!

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Interview with Dr. Tina, Medical Director at Hippocrates Health Institute http://hippocratesinst.org/interview-with-dr-tina-medical-director-at-hippocrates-health-institute http://hippocratesinst.org/interview-with-dr-tina-medical-director-at-hippocrates-health-institute#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 16:47:49 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=5016 What is Functional Medicine? Functional medicine looks for the core cause of a disease. It’s a systems oriented approach, and is not diagnosis oriented. It requires active participation on the part of the patient. It isn’t about the doctor telling the patient what to do; it is a very integrative partnership. Together, we determine what […]

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What is Functional Medicine?

Functional medicine looks for the core cause of a disease. It’s a systems oriented approach, and is not diagnosis oriented. It requires active participation on the part of the patient. It isn’t about the doctor telling the patient what to do; it is a very integrative partnership. Together, we determine what their “toxicity” is about. Is it something that they are unable to eliminate from their body, or what are they taking in that’s causing a toxic effect (aka illness)? This is the medicine that really addresses the needs of the 21st century and where our health care is evolving. It is very patient centered, and is a paradigm shift compared to the traditional model which was very disease centered. In the traditional model, a doctor cannot help you unless they have a diagnosis. Functional medicine focuses on the patient as a whole.

Tell us a little bit about your history as a medical professional?

I began my career in acute care medicine working in emergency departments in NYC. I loved the acute care model because a simple intervention can save a life. Emergency care in the USA has really come so far and is top notch. The work we are doing in trauma care, cardiac care, and stroke care really gives us the ability to saves someone’s life. The problem in emergency departments across the country is that people plagued with chronic debilitating illnesses are coming into the acute care setting looking for answers. That is what got me searching for the bigger picture in the medical realm. The traditional model just stinks when it comes to chronic illness. It was my professional and personal journey that led me to the art of functional medicine. Being in the emergency department and feeling helpless, watching people slowly succumb to diseases that were clearly a result of poor lifestyle choices is what motivated me to pursue functional medicine.


How do you help guests at Hippocrates Health Institute?

Here at Hippocrates Health Institute I am finding that what helps guests the most is the Life Transformation Program, and I am just a sideline. We help our guests with their symptoms of detox, we are able to support them with IV vitamin nutrition and oxygen therapy. I help them solidify their commitment to better health and really help encourage them that it is possible for a life change, and the power lies within them. As a physician/educator it is really about giving people the tools and encouragement to realize that change is possible and it CAN be simple. With my guests, I place a lot of emphasis on hormonal balance and restoration, if necessary. My hormonal treatment varies from other integrative doctors since I am a firm believer that we need to respect the natural cycle and rhythm of hormones and replace them in that fashion. Overall, I am the clinician and health educator on premises, but I do a ton of cheerleading for my patients. They are all on my team, and I want them to win!

What kind of results do you see with using functional medicine?

If I have a patient who is confidant and empowered, and playing an active role in their health care, good results are bound to follow. My Practice Philosophy: The patient is in the driver’s seat. They are inviting me into their health care, but in no way am I in control. Once a patient has established a sense of control over their wellness, change starts to happen. I see better restful sleep, good daily energy, better digestion, clearer skin, and healthy hair and nails. I’ve watched my older patients increase their mobility and stabilize their balance, have better cognitive function, improve their vision, and remain sexually active. It is incredibly satisfying for me to see them living life to its fullest potential regardless of their age or diagnosis
I am grateful and privileged to be a part of the HHI family, and live and share this amazing lifestyle.

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From the Kitchen – HHI Sauerkraut http://hippocratesinst.org/from-the-kitchen-hhi-sauerkraut http://hippocratesinst.org/from-the-kitchen-hhi-sauerkraut#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 20:13:05 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=4515 This delicious recipe yields 4-5 cups! Ingredients: 1 Head Red Cabbage, Shredded 1/2 Apple, Seeded Kombu Seaweed, Soaked, As Needed Outer Cabbage Leaves, As Needed 1.    Place half of the shredded cabbage in a ceramic or glass container. 2.    Press down firmly. 3.    Place the apple in the center of the cabbage. 4.    Place the remaining ½ […]

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This delicious recipe yields 4-5 cups!

Ingredients:

1 Head Red Cabbage, Shredded
1/2 Apple, Seeded
Kombu Seaweed, Soaked, As Needed
Outer Cabbage Leaves, As Needed

1.    Place half of the shredded cabbage in a ceramic or glass container.
2.    Press down firmly.
3.    Place the apple in the center of the cabbage.
4.    Place the remaining ½ of the shredded cabbage on top, always pressing it down firmly.
5.    Cover the top of the cabbage with a layer of hydrated kombu seaweed.
6.    On top of the kombu, place a layer of cabbage leaves.
7.    Place a heavy weight on top of the cabbage leaves, making sure that the entire container is covered so that no foreign matter can enter the kraut. The cabbage will begin to foam and bubble as a result of the fermentation process.
8.    Leave out at room temperature.
9.    After 3-5days (if ready), discard the cabbage leaves, kombu, and apple in the middle.
10.    Place the sauerkraut in a container for storage and refrigerate.

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From the Garden – Yes, We Have Some Bananas! http://hippocratesinst.org/yes-we-have-some-bananas http://hippocratesinst.org/yes-we-have-some-bananas#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:07:03 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=4493 Here at Wheatgrass Central we are also growing hundreds of fruiting trees of over thirty different varieties spread out all over our beautiful fifty acre tropical campus. We harvest our fruit when it is ripe and in season throughout the year which is delivered to the kitchen for the benefit of our guests. The kitchen […]

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Here at Wheatgrass Central we are also growing hundreds of fruiting trees of over thirty different varieties spread out all over our beautiful fifty acre tropical campus. We harvest our fruit when it is ripe and in season throughout the year which is delivered to the kitchen for the benefit of our guests. The kitchen puts this fruit out twice a week for breakfast for those guests who are currently in the program.

Hippocrates Health Institute’s Bananas!

Fruit can be up to 15% of a healthy diet as long as it is picked when it is ripe, it is whole, it is fresh, and organic. Although fruit is not a critical component for a healthy body it can help with the transition from the Standard American Diet (SAD) to the Hippocrates lifestyle. Furthermore, some of our guests may be advised to abstain from fruit for a season depending upon their situation in order to allow the program to be more effective.

The issue with most fruit that is commercially grown for wide spread distribution in large chain supermarkets is that it is often picked weeks or months before it is ripe so that it will have a long shelf life. This allows suppliers to ship the fruit over a larger geographical area for broader distribution which allows them to increase their profits. As the fruit is growing it draws minerals from the tree in the form of sap. If the fruit is picked before it is ripe and then eaten by you it then thinks you are the tree and it begins to draw minerals from you!

This is an excellent reason for you to grow your own food so you can control how it is grown and how it is harvested. When purchasing produce buy locally whenever possible and get to know the growers personally so you can become more aware of their growing and harvesting practices. Come to Hippocrates to get the full download on all the amazing benefits of food when it is properly grown, harvested, and served fresh!

Hippocrates Health Institute’s Mangoes!

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Hippocrates House Dressing http://hippocratesinst.org/hippocrates-house-dressing-3 http://hippocratesinst.org/hippocrates-house-dressing-3#comments Wed, 08 Jul 2015 17:37:26 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=3864 This delicious recipe is a favorite among Hippocrates Health Institute guests. It is rich in omega 3’s and rich in flavor! Hippocrates House Dressing Blend at a high speed: 1/4 cup plus 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1/8 cup Braggs 1 Tbsp. water 3 cloves garlic 2 Tsp. ground yellow mustard seeds 1/8 Tsp. cayenne While blending […]

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This delicious recipe is a favorite among Hippocrates Health Institute guests. It is rich in omega 3’s and rich in flavor!

Hippocrates House Dressing

Blend at a high speed:

1/4 cup plus 1 Tbsp. lemon juice

1/8 cup Braggs

1 Tbsp. water

3 cloves garlic

2 Tsp. ground yellow mustard seeds

1/8 Tsp. cayenne

While blending slowly add:

3/4 cup of oil blend: olive, flax, hemp

 

This dressing is thick and creamy and will last in the fridge for 2 weeks. (Double the recipe for easier blending)

Sever over greens or use as mustard!

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From The Garden – Purslane http://hippocratesinst.org/from-the-garden-purslane http://hippocratesinst.org/from-the-garden-purslane#comments Wed, 08 Jul 2015 17:09:43 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=3860 Purslane Purslane is normally considered by many people to be an annoyingly common invasive yard weed. In reality it is a tasty “wild edible” that is packed with nutrients and traditionally used for a number of health benefits. The soft, succulent purslane leaves, flowers, and stems can be eaten alone or mixed with your salad. […]

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Purslane
Purslane is normally considered by many people to be an annoyingly common invasive yard weed. In reality it is a tasty “wild edible” that is packed with nutrients and traditionally used for a number of health benefits. The soft, succulent purslane leaves, flowers, and stems can be eaten alone or mixed with your salad. Here are some of the key nutritional constituents of purslane:

• Excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids (better than fish oil!)
• An excellent source of Vitamin A, one of the highest among green leafy vegetables
• A rich source of vitamin C, and some B-complex vitamins like riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine and carotenoids
• A rich source of dietary minerals, such as iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese.

Purslane has been traditionally used for:

• Decreasing the risk of heart attack and stroke.
• Autoimmune diseases such as lupus.
• Maintaining heart health.
• Lowering cholesterol.
• Regulating blood pressure.
• Enriching brain health.
• As an anti-depressant.
• Boosting the immune system
• Inflammatory bowel disease.
• Rheumatoid arthritis.
Prostrate spurge (Euphorbia maculata) is another weed that somewhat resembles purslane, but it’s toxic (it won’t kill you, but it can make you ill). Spurge has a similar growing pattern (low on the ground), but the leaves are thinner and smaller and sometimes have a spot of reddish coloring at the center of the leaf. The stems of the spurge are hairy and the flowers look different.

The foolproof way to differentiate between the two is by breaking a stem. The stem of the spurge oozes a milky white sap. IF THERE IS A WHITE SAP, IT IS NOT PURSLANE!

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