Hippocrates Health Institute http://hippocratesinst.org Just another WordPress site Fri, 02 Dec 2016 21:18:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.4 Gifts That Give Back http://hippocratesinst.org/gifts-that-give-back Wed, 30 Nov 2016 17:18:57 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=72069 GIFTS THAT GIVE BACK …… great gifts, better karma Our gifts supports Fair Trade, which leads to an enriched understanding of the global community and a better life for all. When you purchase a gift that supports Fair Trade, you are giving families and villages opportunities that they might never have had. Gifts under $30 […]

The post Gifts That Give Back appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
GIFTS THAT GIVE BACK …… great gifts, better karma


Our gifts supports Fair Trade, which leads to an enriched understanding of the global community and a better life for all. When you purchase a gift that supports Fair Trade, you are giving families and villages opportunities that they might never have had.

Gifts under $30

Kudu Klip $28:

Create dozens of hairstyles in less than a minute! This versatile hair accessory works on ALL types of hair, from the very fine to ultra thick. When you purchase these unique hair accessories, you are supporting BUILD ON HOPE, a non-profit organization involved in animal conservation in Africa. Wear in your hair and show that you care.

Club Bag $28:

The Ultimate functional fashion accessory are hand beaded with artisian fabric.   These super attractive bags provide compact, efficient storage for any person on the go. Holds any size cell phone, and has secret pocket for cash or credit cards. Comes with wrist strap and cross body strap.

Huipil Collection Coin Purse $15 or

Guatemala’s traditional clothing is called Huipil. Huipils have been worn by Mayan woman since ancient times. The designs woven into each Huipil shows the individual’s personality, the village, the marital, social and religious status of a Guatemalan woman. Huipils are woven by hand using traditional back strap looms. Zippered Coin Purse.

Huipil Compact Bag $19 This beautiful compact bag, is great for carrying cell phone, keys, cash, etc with a cross strap. Handcrafted in the highlands of Guatemala, each piece is carefully made preserving cultural traditions and craft making techniques that have been passed on for generations.  

Gifts $10 or under

Handmade Beaded Keychains $8 Peruse an assortment of beautiful handmade critters, all intricately created by hand. A very special gift for any age!

Guatemalan Worry Dolls $10: According to Mayan legend, worry dolls take away worries while you sleep. Wisper worries to them and place them under you pillow. In the morning the dolls will have taken your worries away! Comes with 4 worry dolls in a hand crocheted bag. Handmade in Guatemala following Fair Trade guidelines.

Personalized Worry Dolls $5: Do you know someone with personal worries? Give a miniature personalized worry doll to take their cares away. Selection includes weight worries, worry free mom-to-be, parenting worries, car worries, marriage worries, hair worries, workaholic worries, etc.

Comforting Clay Clips $8: Carry these handcrafted comforting clay heart or cross as a constant reminder to show love to those around you. Each piece is a blank canvas for you to create a work of art as vibrant as the love in your heart. Can put on your purse, key chain, coat, or wherever you wish!

Call Oasis Therapy Center to Order: (561) 471-5867

The post Gifts That Give Back appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Big is Not Always Better http://hippocratesinst.org/big-is-not-always-better Wed, 30 Nov 2016 16:15:38 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=72054 By Brian Clement, PhD, LN Self-esteem, the most important attribute that anyone can possess, is not taught, acknowledged or often practiced. On the contrary, self-loathing seems to be the most popular human sport, resulting in a wide array of dysfunctional activities. As surface thinkers, one would believe that the reason we self-destruct on an anatomical level […]

The post Big is Not Always Better appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
By Brian Clement, PhD, LN

Self-esteem, the most important attribute that anyone can possess, is not taught, acknowledged or often practiced. On the contrary, self-loathing seems to be the most popular human sport, resulting in a wide array of dysfunctional activities. As surface thinkers, one would believe that the reason we self-destruct on an anatomical level is merely from the foods we consume. This unfortunate façade is why diets do not work. Evaluating your own personal perception about your worthiness would be a far better measurement as to why you are harboring the disease of excess weight.

Let us focus on the number one destroyer of health — obesity. Body image generally reflects ones feeling about themselves. An anorexic is virtually holding a sign over their head saying “look at how little I like myself.” A plump person has the same sign. In our current world, we may be able to pick out the anorexic but overweight and even obese people now look normal in the human landscape. Not to oversimplify the discussion about self-esteem, but for this conversation, we are going to focus in on the concern of extra pounds.

When interviewing a guest here at Hippocrates 30 years ago, I will never forget their response when I asked why they were 200 lbs. overweight. They believed it was a way to protect themselves from hurt and sadness and the fear they carried from their childhood abuse. That day I believe I had my first real awakening to why they, others, and even I, worked hard to let ourselves go.

Years later, I remember speaking to a woman who was fatherless throughout her youth. She was a fanatic zealot when it came to dieting and exercise. That not being enough, plastic surgery was also consistently used to adorn her body. She told me she had to look good so somebody would love her. Recently, a 19-year-old girl who had plunged her body weight to 78 lbs. (at 5’ 10″) sat in my office and told the story about her brother, and the way he would sexually abuse her when she was just a baby. Although none of these stories may resonate with you, look at yourself in the mirror and unless you feel comfortable in your skin and capable of achieving anything you desire with your current body, the question is why have you harmed yourself?

Sad people do bad things to themselves and it is a resolution of the sadness that is essential for the necessary change. Dick Gregory, social activist and comedian, called me 35 years ago asking if Hippocrates and I could help with his new project in the Bahamas. He said, “We want to help some fat people, like I was, get skinny.” Unexpectedly, the first person he flew down to the island weighed more than one thousand pounds. This young man had literally sat in his NY apartment for years ordering food that he perpetually consumed. Unable to walk due to his extreme weight, he was made buoyant in the ocean water so he could mobilize and walk some of the pounds off during his daily six hour ocean encounter. One year later, on the Hippocrates diet and the Bahamian diet powder (plant based food supplement), he weighed less than 300 lbs. Looking good, feeling well and heading back to NYC, he was surely successful in his plunge to health. Unfortunately, there was not enough emotional and mental support for him so when his girlfriend abruptly left, he returned to his pattern of self-destruction. Eating and drugging his way up to 750 lbs, his heart finally gave out and he had to be buried in a Steinway piano container. This was the day that I recognized the necessity for counseling in severe cases of self-loathing.

Big is not better, and all broken can be fixed. No matter what possesses you, there is a way to resolve those emulsifiers of spirit. Simply said, your roadblocks to the highway of fulfillment are the unresolved issues from your past journeys. Like myself, many of us look at our history and say there has been nothing that caused us even the slightest concern. Unfortunately, it is rare that this is true. Even issues that may seem minor can reduce self-empowerment if left unresolved.

In my 30s and feeling good, healthy and well, a close friend had just received his PhD in psychotherapy with an emphasis on hypnosis. Relentlessly, he pursued me to let him try his craft. Of course, I said no. I felt like I had no problems and there would be no need to waste his time. Finally, I said, “You will be unable to hypnotize me, so let’s get this done in five minutes.” Two hours later I awoke soaking wet from tears and being told I had a remarkably good life except for that one time, at 16, when I perceived my father did not want to be friends with me and attend a Simon and Garfunkel concert. He explained to me that I had stepped up and asked my dad to accept me as a man and an equal but his busy work schedule would not allow him to join me for the show. I perceived this as a rejection rather than the innocent fact that my father was busier than I could have imagined. Little did I know that this had burdened me throughout my adult life until I was willing to let my inexperienced friend tamper with my past and thank God, release me, from a life altering experience.

Needless to say, between age 16 and 19, I had eaten my way into obesity. So often we believe that our problems come from some mystical faraway place, yet all of them stem from personal experiences that have been understood or perceived incorrectly. These little obstacles spin together to create the beginning of a formidable storm that quite often paralyzes our lives. Can you imagine how many of us are using our forks and knives to pacify the broken hearts that we harbor?

Drugs, including alcohol, are most often accused as being the antidote of unhappiness. “Food,” including sugar, is by far the universally pervasive substitute for happiness. When filling our mouths and bellies up with stuff, we deaden our hearts and minds so that we do not have to experience our joyless lives.

Sensual, social and sexual patterns surround food consumption. When burdened with brokenness, we divert our attention from the essential need for real food as fuel and think of eating as a recreational activity. Patterns create habitual activity that surrounds this process, which is apparently accepted as normal. When evaluating humanity’s current mindset concerning fare, it is grotesque without much connection to its nutritional heritage.

Orthomolecular medicine, founded by Linus Pauling, was the first science proving that all disease had a nutritional deficiency component. Psychological and spiritual pathways predispose us to weight concerns, and once we develop body image problems, the lack of nutrients from real food accelerates the vicious pattern of weight imbalance. We now know that chromium deficiencies, which are very common, lead to blood sugar concerns, sparking our desire to continually eat.

Heavy animal protein diets have proven inadequate to provide enough digestible protein, and also cause an unnatural pattern of gluttony. Easy to digest plant protein foods such as sprouts, algae, etc. all regulate amino acid distribution, curbing the craving. Sugar consumption, be it white sugar, orange juice or agave syrup (to name just a few), all explode the bodies desire to eat until dead. Addictive substances are not sought by the overwhelming majority, yet sugar is the one exception. If we are forced to name the largest “food” culprit in weight gain, hands down all forms of sugar and cooked complex carbohydrates that break down into sugar (breads, starchy potatoes, pastas) win.

As you see, there is a multitude of complex yet fixable concerns at the root of weight gain. With this said, I will leave you with three basic remedies:

  1. Find out what is eating you and discard it.
  2. Find what you love and do it.
  3. Consume only enriching food, not rich food.

Remain well by being happy and fulfilled.

The post Big is Not Always Better appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
How to Make Great Compost http://hippocratesinst.org/how-to-make-great-compost Tue, 29 Nov 2016 20:01:37 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=71968 The secret to successful gardening is in the quality of the soil. The plants that we tend to cultivate need lots of humus (the organic component of soil) and minerals in order to grow strong, healthy, and vibrant. In organic gardening that means compost and rock dust. The compost provides humus and nitrogen while the […]

The post How to Make Great Compost appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
The secret to successful gardening is in the quality of the soil. The plants that we tend to cultivate need lots of humus (the organic component of soil) and minerals in order to grow strong, healthy, and vibrant. In organic gardening that means compost and rock dust. The compost provides humus and nitrogen while the rock dust provides many other trace minerals. You will need to add a significant amount of compost and a small amount of rock dust to your existing soil as amendments. You can make your own compost as directed below or you can purchase compost from a garden nursery or Home Depot. Rock dust can be obtained at a quarry or a granite countertop company or online. 

For making compost at home I recommend that you get two of the “SpinBin Compost 60” tumblers which can be purchased online. Place these two tumblers side by side somewhere close to the garden. Start by adding one shovel-full of organic soil (or a few probiotics capsules) to one of the tumblers to act as a starter culture. Next, begin adding fresh green and brown organic matter.

Add at a ratio of four parts green organic matter to one part brown organic matter. Flip the tumbler over daily. Add one to two cups of water once a week. Continue to do this for two months. 

On the third month stop adding fresh organic matter to the first tumbler and switch to the second tumbler. Start the second tumbler in exactly the same way as the first one and begin adding fresh organic matter. This way one of your tumblers will always be available to add fresh organic matter while the other one is able to finish processing. Flip both tumblers over daily. The more often you flip your tumblers the faster the organic matter will decompose. If you follow this procedure and alternate the active tumbler every other month you will have a steady supply of finished compost on a regular basis 

Here are the kinds of materials to add to your active compost tumbler.

Green Organic Matter:

  • Kitchen scraps (no processed oils or animal products)
  • Root mats from your sprouts and wheatgrass
  • Grass clippings
  • Seaweed

Brown Organic Matter:

  • Dried leaves
  • Sawdust or sawdust pellets (not from pressure treated wood)
  • Shredded paper (with plant-based inks only)

At the beginning of the planting season add mature compost on the top of your garden area and spread evenly to about 6-8” thick. For a 10’X10’ sized garden this will take about 10 large wheel barrel loads of compost and fourteen pounds of rock dust sprinkled evenly. Using a spade shovel turn the compost and rock dust in to the existing soil to mix about 50/50. Level the area off with a steel rake. Now, you are ready to plant! You will need to repeat this process at the beginning of every planting season. You should also use your compost as a side dressing for your growing plants. Add about four cups of mature compost around the base of each plant once every two weeks throughout the growing season.

Article by Brian Hetrich, Greenhouse Manager at HHI

The post How to Make Great Compost appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Spicy Kimchi http://hippocratesinst.org/hhi-kimchi Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:29:47 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=7318 Kimchi is low in fat and high in fiber and even better when you make it yourself! To top it all off, an easy low fat dressing can be made by simply putting your kimchi in the blender and blending till smooth. Kimchi Recipe 1 Head Green Cabbage, Finely Sliced 1 Carrot, Shredded 4 Large […]

The post Spicy Kimchi appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Kimchi is low in fat and high in fiber and even better when you make it yourself! To top it all off, an easy low fat dressing can be made by simply putting your kimchi in the blender and blending till smooth.

Kimchi Recipe

1 Head Green Cabbage, Finely Sliced

1 Carrot, Shredded

4 Large Red Peppers, Finely Chopped

9 Scallions, Sliced (Reserve Bottom of Scallions)

1 Fresh Hot Pepper, 1/2 Tsp Cayenne to taste

Kombuk Seaweed, Soaked, (As Needed)

2 Tsp. Chopped Ginger

3 Oz. Soaked Kombu Water

1 Apple, Cut in Half and Seeded

2 Cloves Garlic

Outer Cabbage Leaves (As Needed)

Technique

  1. Mix cabbage, carrot, peppers, and scallion in large bowl.
  2. Put scallion bottoms, hot pepper or cayenne, garlic, ginger, and water in blender and liquefy.
  3. Mix thoroughly with cabbage mixture.
  4. Place half of the cabbage mixture in a ceramic or glass container. Press down firmly.
  5. Place the apple in the center of the cabbage.
  6. Place the remaining ½ if the shredded cabbage on top, always pressing it down firmly.
  7. Cover the top of the cabbage with a layer of hydrated kombu seaweed.
  8. On top of the Kombu, place a layer of cabbage leaves.
  9. Place a heavy weight on top of the cabbage leaves, making sure that the entire container is covered and that no foreign matte can enter the mixture. The cabbage will begin to foam and bubble as a result of the fermentation process. Leave out at room temperature.
  10. Let stand for 3-5 days.
  11. Discard the cabbage leaves, Kombu, and apple in the middle.
  12. Place the mixture in a container for storage and refrigerate.

The post Spicy Kimchi appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Cranberry Ginger Dressing http://hippocratesinst.org/cranberry-ginger-dressing Wed, 23 Nov 2016 18:03:04 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=71454 A few times a year HHI offers some sweet treats for special meals. Our Cranberry Ginger Dressing is sure to be a beautiful, tangy, addition to any salad. Ingredients: Three 1/4 inch slices of ginger 1.5 Cups  fresh squeezed orange juice 3 cups cranberries 1/2 tsp kelp 1 pinch cayenne pepper 1/3 cup extra virgin […]

The post Cranberry Ginger Dressing appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
A few times a year HHI offers some sweet treats for special meals. Our Cranberry Ginger Dressing is sure to be a beautiful, tangy, addition to any salad.

Ingredients:

Three 1/4 inch slices of ginger

1.5 Cups  fresh squeezed orange juice

3 cups cranberries

1/2 tsp kelp

1 pinch cayenne pepper

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

8 dates or stevia to taste

 

Blend all ingredients and serve on your favorite sprouts and salad greens!

The post Cranberry Ginger Dressing appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Green Friday Specials http://hippocratesinst.org/green-friday-specials Wed, 23 Nov 2016 15:50:09 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=71441 Green Friday Specials 9AM -12 Noon  30% off all Lifegive supplements                           (No multiple discounts can be applied) LifeGive MeltAway (Original Formula) **BOGO** LifeGive HHI-Zymes (1500 caps) **BOGO** All books **BOGO* (of equal or lesser value) All juicers & dehydrators 25% off All air purifiers & water distillers 25% Sun Warrior Protein Powder 25% off with free […]

The post Green Friday Specials appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Green Friday Specials 9AM -12 Noon

 30% off all Lifegive supplements                          

(No multiple discounts can be applied)

  • LifeGive MeltAway (Original Formula) **BOGO**
  • LifeGive HHI-Zymes (1500 caps) **BOGO**
  • All books **BOGO* (of equal or lesser value)
  • All juicers & dehydrators 25% off
  • All air purifiers & water distillers 25%

Sun Warrior Protein Powder 25% off with free Blender Bottle


Thanksgiving Weekend Specials

20% Off All EMF Equipment & All Sprouting Equipment

30% Off Organic Sheets & Pillows, Non-Electric Food Prep, All Bags & Purses

40% Off, All Organic Clothing

Free Shipping on orders over $100.00 within the Continental US


How to make your Purchase

Walk In Store Hours: 

Thursday: 9-1     Friday: 9-6:30     Saturday: 9-3     Sunday: 11-3

Phone Mail Order Hours: (877.582.5850)

Thursday: Closed   Friday: 9-5     Saturday: 9-3   Sunday: Closed

*Due to the expected increase in the volume of calls to Mail Order on Friday and Saturday, we may not be able to get to your call. We will be happy to honor any Special Weekend pricing in effect during the time you leave your message via phone (877.582.5850 or Email (MailOrder@hippocratesinst.org)

*No multiple discounts can be applied.

*Pricing good for current purchases only and may not be applied to past purchases.

The post Green Friday Specials appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Health, Family, and Plant-Based Food http://hippocratesinst.org/health-family-and-plant-based-food Wed, 23 Nov 2016 15:31:19 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=71433 As we set aside some time during this Holiday season to be grateful for the many blessings in our lives let us not forget to give thanks for the greatest gift of all – the gift of family and friends! It occurs to me that the best thing we can do to enjoy the company […]

The post Health, Family, and Plant-Based Food appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
As we set aside some time during this Holiday season to be grateful for the many blessings in our lives let us not forget to give thanks for the greatest gift of all – the gift of family and friends! It occurs to me that the best thing we can do to enjoy the company of our cherished loved ones as long as possible into our lives is to do everything we can to insure our own good health and that of those who are closest to us. Here at Hippocrates Health Institute we believe that good health is every person’s birthright, and that a life free of disease and pain is our human legacy. However, the blessing of good health is more than just happenstance.

After many dozens of years of research we have definitively determined that the quality of your life and your health is completely within your control. We have scientifically validated and reconfirmed the power of consuming raw plant food and its phenomenally positive impact on human health. More often than not, disease is prevented and eliminated, and premature aging halted largely due to the raw, whole food, plant-based diet that we prescribe in our signature Life Transformation Program. But, apart from taking up permanent residence here at the “World’s Premier Health Encounter” how can you best implement this lifestyle once you graduate from the program? 

Eating Healthy at Home

Here are some easy tips and suggestions to introduce your family to the power of raw, whole food, plant-based diet:

  1. Clean out your kitchen of any animal products, junk food, processed food, soda, sweets, coffee, cooked food, candy, cookies. Pretty much anything that is in a can, bottle, box, bag, or jar that does not have to be refrigerated, has artificial preservatives added, and has a long expiration date should go.
  2. If you do not already have them set up your kitchen with the right equipment including a high quality blender (I recommend the Vitamix), a high quality juicer (I recommend the Omega 900HD), a food processor, and a dehydrator.
  3. Learn how to make delicious raw vegan recipes. You have to learn to love the food or it will not be sustainable to eat this way in the long term. We offer several excellent raw vegan recipe books in the Hippocrates store for your consideration. We also offer Saturday classes to outside visitors here at Hippocrates on gourmet raw vegan cuisine preparation. Our next class is on December 17, 2016.
  4. Based upon the new raw vegan recipes you have just learned, stock up your refrigerator with fresh, whole, ripe, raw, organic produce, nuts, seeds, and herbs.
  5. Make a big, fresh salad as the “main course” of every meal. Learn how to make delicious, healthy homemade salad dressings from one of our recipe books.
  6. Learn how to grow your own sprouts at home! It is easy, economical, and fun! Kids love to get involved in sprouting. And, you are feeding yourself and your family the most nutritious food on the planet for under one dollar a pound! Sprout bags work great for growing sprouts while on the road. They fold up flat so they do not take up any space and there is no glass to break. You can grow sprouts in your hotel room by hanging your sprout bag up by the shower curtain. The Easy Sprouter comes with a flat lid with holes in it designed specifically for growing sprouts while travelling. This way your sprouts can still breathe with no danger of spilling. Add sprouts to every salad and use your sprouts for snacks. Sprouting is easy, does not cost much, and does not take a lot of space if it is done correctly. We offer an excellent sprouting book and DVD in the Hippocrates store for your consideration. We also offer Saturday classes to outside visitors here at Hippocrates on how you can easily grow sprouts at home. Our next class is on December 17, 2016.
  7. Make a fresh green drink and wheatgrass juice and drink them every day.

Eating Healthy Outside the Home

With some prior planning you can still enjoy eating healthy outside the home while enjoying the company of your co-workers, friends and family. Here are some tips and suggestions to best achieve this goal:

  1. Google raw vegan restaurants, health food stores and juice bars near your home, place of work, and travel destinations. Make these establishments your preferred choices for eating out. Most health food stores and grocery stores will offer salad bars where you can eat healthy. The web site HappyCow.com will list and rate healthy restaurants, juice bars, health food stores, and even vegetarian/vegan bed and breakfasts around the world.
  2. Even conventional restaurants will almost always offer a garden salad as a side dish or as a starter. Sometimes I order two and make it a meal. Ask the waiter for additions such as avocado, red bell pepper, cucumber, onions, etc. to spruce it up. Ask for some lemon wedges, oregano flakes and some olive oil and make your own healthy dressing. I sometimes smuggle into the restaurant an avocado and a bag of home-grown sprouts that I can discreetly add to my salad.
  3. Drink lots of water to help fill you up before you go out. Thirst is often mistaken for hunger. By drinking some water you may find you do not need to eat as much food in order to feel full.
  4. When you are invited to a friend’s house for a gathering prepare your favorite raw vegan dish ahead of time and take it with you to share with others. This way you will be assured that you will have something healthy to eat.
  5. When traveling overnight and choosing accommodations, request a room with a kitchenette or at least a refrigerator. This will allow you to stop at a grocery store or health food store ahead of time and bring some fresh healthy whole foods back to the room with you to have later.
  6. Finally, you may want to consider preparing and eating something healthy at home to at least partially fill you up before you go out.

For social support consider immersing yourself in the healthy eating world by attending raw vegan dinners and potlucks and “un-cooking” classes. If there are none in your area you can start hosting raw vegan potlucks at your home. Get involved in the local raw food community by joining raw food meetup groups in your area where you can make new friends. You can find such groups at meetup.com.

This Holiday season why not give yourself the gift of the best health ever by coming here to the Hippocrates Health Institute and treating yourself to our world renowned Life Transformation Program? Your body will thank you and your friends and family will thank you, too. You will add many quality years to your life enabling you to have more fun and achieve more of your dreams. I wish every one of you a happy Holiday season and a long, healthy, productive, and fulfilling life.

Article by Brian Hetrich, Greenhouse Manager at Hippocrates Health Institute

The post Health, Family, and Plant-Based Food appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
“Green” Friday Specials 2016 http://hippocratesinst.org/green-friday-specials-2016 Wed, 16 Nov 2016 20:45:12 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=70789 The Scents of the Holidays: Our Holiday Trio Explore the Holiday scents of Peppermint, Clove Bud and Juniper Berry essential oils. These three wonderful oils can be used individually or blended together in an ultrasonic diffuser to give support to your body during this holiday season as well as create a memorable holiday atmosphere. Peppermint […]

The post “Green” Friday Specials 2016 appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
The Scents of the Holidays:

Our Holiday Trio

Explore the Holiday scents of Peppermint, Clove Bud and Juniper Berry essential oils. These three wonderful oils can be used individually or blended together in an ultrasonic diffuser to give support to your body during this holiday season as well as create a memorable holiday atmosphere.

Peppermint – Peppermint is a top essential oil to have at home, not only for this holiday season, but for your everyday routine. The list of Peppermint usage is really endless: its refreshing aroma helps with nausea, digestive issues including IBS, bad breath, improving mental focus, reducing anxiety, releasing tight or sore muscles, unclogging sinuses and giving allergy relief. Peppermint oil, when massaged into your temples, front hair line and the back of your neck, relieves a headache very quickly. When the holiday season is over, peppermint oil will repel bugs from your home and help with insects bites.

Clove Bud: (Spicy clove bud and the lightly coniferous juniper berry aromas will remind you about the Holidays all year around. Clove bud oil has extremely high antimicrobial and antiviral properties that can help you to avoid the flu and cold this winter season. When diffused into air, clove essential oil kills germs and fills the air with a warm and cozy smell. Clove bud essential oil is the number one oil for dental and oral care. Applied to the tooth it relieves a toothache, when dissolved in water it may be used as a gargle mix for sore throat and cough. It can even help to eliminate bad breath and reverse gingivitis. This is because Clove essential oil has the highest antioxidant capacity among any other food or essential oil.

Juniper Berry: The soothing smell of Juniper Berry essential oil is famous for its calming and sedative effect. It helps to relieve nervous tension and get rid of intellectual fatigue. A couple of drops rubbed between the palms and brushed over the aura is strengthening and purifying. On a physical level, it is a very good cleansing tonic oil and can be used for a detoxing massage or bath, helping to eliminate common toxins from the body. Juniper berry oil improves blood circulation and helps to keep it oxygenated. Paired with peppermint, juniper oil will help you to unwind and relax tired muscles after a long day.

Now through December 31, save by purchasing this “Holiday Trio” and Ultrasonic Diffuser for only $99 (A $118 value). These oils, with the diffuser, will make a fantastic gift for your family to promote health and wellness all year long. Call Oasis to purchase: (561) 571-5867


CAMPUS ONLY Gift Card Special

Purchase $100.00 in Gift Cards and receive a $20.00 Gift Card Free

Good for Purchases of Goods and Services and any tuition in  2017. 

This promotion is available on campus only Nov 24 and 25, 2016

The post “Green” Friday Specials 2016 appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Tremendous Trio http://hippocratesinst.org/tremendous-trio Wed, 16 Nov 2016 19:44:44 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=70781 Try this tremendous recipe for the holidays! Perfect for raw vegans or those just willing to try a taste. Yield: 4-6 servings 1 Butternut Squash, Peeled & Seeded 1 Sweet Potato 1 Carrot Dressing: 3⁄4 C. Chopped Carrot 1⁄8 C. Lemon Juice 1⁄2 C. Raw, Organic Sesame Oil 3⁄4 Tsp. Ginger, Minced 3⁄4 Tsp. Kelp […]

The post Tremendous Trio appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Try this tremendous recipe for the holidays! Perfect for raw vegans or those just willing to try a taste.

Yield: 4-6 servings

  • 1 Butternut Squash, Peeled & Seeded
  • 1 Sweet Potato
  • 1 Carrot

Dressing:

  • 3⁄4 C. Chopped Carrot
  • 1⁄8 C. Lemon Juice
  • 1⁄2 C. Raw, Organic Sesame Oil
  • 3⁄4 Tsp. Ginger, Minced
  • 3⁄4 Tsp. Kelp Powder
  • 1 Tsp. Cinnamon
  • 3⁄4 Tsp. Pumpkin Pie Spice
  • 1 T. Frontier Vanilla (without alcohol)

1. In a food processor, thinly slice squash, sweet potato and carrot.

2. In a strong blender, blend dressing to smooth consistency.

3. Toss and serve.

The post Tremendous Trio appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
Natural Ways to Strengthen Bones http://hippocratesinst.org/natural-ways-to-strengthen-bones Wed, 16 Nov 2016 16:29:47 +0000 http://hippocratesinst.org/?p=70732 What is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is characterized by an increase in porosity of the bones and a corresponding decreased bone mass, resulting in an increased risk of fractures of the bones. Osteopenia is a term used to denote bone loss that is not as severe as osteoporosis. Risk factors for osteoporosis include sedentary lifestyle, cigarette smoking, […]

The post Natural Ways to Strengthen Bones appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>
What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is characterized by an increase in porosity of the bones and a corresponding decreased bone mass, resulting in an increased risk of fractures of the bones. Osteopenia is a term used to denote bone loss that is not as severe as osteoporosis. Risk factors for osteoporosis include sedentary lifestyle, cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol intake, family history of the disease, and various medical conditions such as: rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, hyper thyroidism, diabetes, chronic lung disease, Cushing’s syndrome, and hyper para-thyroidism.

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation:

  • Worldwide, osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures annually, resulting in an osteoporotic fracture every three seconds ([1]).
  • Osteoporosis is estimated to affect 200 million women worldwide – approximately one-tenth of women aged 60, one-fifth of women aged 70, two-fifths of women aged 80, and two-thirds of women aged 90 and above ([2]).
  • Osteoporosis affects an estimated 75 million people just in Europe, USA, and Japan ([3]).
  • Worldwide, one-in-three women over age 50 will experience osteoporotic fractures, as will one-in-five men aged over 50 ([4],[5],[6]).
  • Nearly 75% percent of hip, spine, and forearm fractures occur among patients 65 years old or over ([6]).
  • By 2050, the worldwide incidence of hip fracture in men is projected to increase by 310 percent and 240 percent in women, compared to rates in 1990 ([7]).
  • Osteoporosis takes a huge personal and economic toll. In Europe, the disability due to osteoporosis is greater than that caused by cancers (with the exception of lung cancer) and is comparable or greater than that lost to a variety of chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and high blood pressure related heart disease ([8]).

Dietary factors that affect osteoporosis:

Refined sugar. Hamsters fed a high-sucrose diet (56% of calories) developed osteoporosis ([9]). In young rats, the replacement of starch by sucrose in the diet interfered with bone development ([10]). In an observational study, consumption of large amounts of candy was associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) in both men and women ([11]).

There are many possible ways in which consuming refined sugars could lead to bone loss. Since refined sugars are essentially devoid of micronutrients, eating refined sugar decreases the intake of various vitamins and minerals that are important for bone health. Sugar is acidic to the body and the body will use calcium from bone and teeth to reduce acidity in the body, thus weakening the bones.

Cola beverages. In observational studies, higher intake of cola drinks was associated with lower bone mineral density in women and a higher incidence of fractures in adolescent girls ([12],[13]). The apparent adverse effect of colas on bone health could be due in part to their content of phosphoric acid, which may cause calcium to be released from bone in order to buffer the acidity. The caffeine in cola drinks may also be a factor.

Caffeine. Ingestion of a single dose of caffeine transiently increased urinary calcium excretion in both men and women in a dose-dependent manner ([14],[15],[16]). Many ([17],[18],[19]) observational studies found that a higher intake of caffeine was associated with lower bone mineral density, more rapid bone loss, or increased risk of hip fracture.

Sodium. In a short-term study, high intake of sodium chloride increased urinary calcium excretion in healthy postmenopausal women in a dose-dependent manner ([20]). High salt intake has also been associated with increased urinary excretion of hydroxyproline, which is indicative of increased bone resorption ([21]). In a study with rats, the addition of 1.8 percent sodium chloride to the drinking water significantly decreased bone mineral density ([22]). An observational study found that higher sodium intake was associated with more rapid bone loss especially in postmenopausal women ([23]).

Carbonated beverages. Excessive phosphorous reacts with the calcium to form an insoluble compound and inhibiting absorption of calcium from the digestive system, phosphorus causes bone loss. It also causes calcium losses from bone by metabolizing to phosphoric acid, which has to be neutralized with calcium. Excessive phosphorous is contained in soft drinks, cheese and chocolate drinks.

Milk. Milk is widely promoted as a food that is good for our bones. However, a 12-year prospective study of 77,761 female health professionals found that the incidence of hip fractures was higher by 45 percent in women who consumed two or more glasses of milk per day than in those who consumed one glass or less per week ([24]).

Nutrients to support strong bones:

Calcium. Calcium is a major component of bone tissue. Adequate calcium intake is important both early in life for achieving optimal peak bone mass and later in life for slowing bone loss. Green juice, leafy greens, sesame seeds, seaweeds (kelp) and broccoli sprouts are great sources of calcium.

Magnesium. It is impossible to build bone without magnesium. Magnesium is necessary for numerous bone-related reactions including the conversion of vitamin D to its bioactive form, which is necessary for calcium absorption. Several studies have shown that about 80 percent of the American population get only two-thirds of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of the required magnesium. Additionally, the (RDA) for magnesium is known to be too low. Kelp, almonds and legumes are great sources of magnesium.

Vitamin D. Vitamin D enhances the intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, promotes bone mineralization, and is involved in regulating serum calcium and phosphorus levels. Vitamin D deficiency in adults causes osteomalacia, which is characterized by softening of bones, bone pain, and muscle weakness. A lot of older people do not get enough vitamin D because they tend to stay out of the sun. Fenugreek sprouts, shiitake mushrooms, sunflower sprouts and the sun are great sources of vitamin D.

Manganese. Manganese is required for bone mineralization and for synthesis of the organic matrix on which calcification takes place. A study reported in Science News found that osteoporotic women had serum manganese levels of only 25 percent of that of the control group. Spinach, pumpkin seeds and hazelnuts are great sources of manganese.

Vitamin K. A study in Clinical Endocrinology found that vitamin K supplementation reduced urinary calcium losses in osteoporosis patients by 18 to 50 percent. Green leafy vegetables, spring onions, asparagus and olive oil are great sources of vitamin K.

Vitamin C, strontium, silicon, folic acid, boron, and other nutrients also play important roles. Calcium metabolism is very complex and requires adequate amounts of many nutrients. To prevent and support the healing of osteoporosis you first have to reduce calcium losses by drastically reducing your intake of sugar, salt, phosphorous, and caffeine. Secondly, you have to consume the right amounts of nutrients that support formation of new bone such as calcium, magnesium, manganese, boron, vitamin D, and other key nutrients.

Exercise to strengthen bones:

Weight-bearing exercise, in addition to slowing or reversing bone loss, may increase strength and balance, thereby reducing the risk of falls. Exercise, especially weight bearing exercise, will actually increase bone mass and reverse bone loss. A three-year study of older women at the University of Wisconsin showed that a control group of sedentary women lost three percent of bone density while the group that exercised gained two percent.

The best way to achieve strong bones is to eat a plant-based diet consisting of a variety of fresh, unprocessed, organic vegetables, whole grains and sprouts. Take high quality, whole-food nutritional supplements which contain the essential bone-forming nutrients. Get regular exercise, including an essential weight-bearing program.


[1] Johnell O and Kanis JA (2006) An estimate of the worldwide prevalence and disability associated with osteoporotic fractures. Osteoporos Int 17:1726.

[2] Kanis JA (2007) WHO Technical Report, University of Sheffield, UK: 66.

[3] EFFO and NOF (1997) Who are candidates for prevention and treatment for osteoporosis? Osteoporos Int 7:1.

[4] Melton LJ, 3rd, Atkinson EJ, O’Connor MK, et al. (1998) Bone density and fracture risk in men. J Bone Miner Res 13:1915.

[5] Melton LJ, 3rd, Chrischilles EA, Cooper C, et al. (1992) Perspective. How many women have osteoporosis? J Bone Miner Res 7:1005.

[6] Melton LJ, 3rd, Crowson CS, O’Fallon WM (1999) Fracture incidence in Olmsted County, Minnesota:

comparison of urban with rural rates and changes in urban rates over time. Osteoporos Int 9:29.

[7] Gullberg B, Johnell O, Kanis JA (1997) World-wide projections for hip fracture. Osteoporos Int 7:407.

[8] Johnell O and Kanis JA (2006) An estimate of the worldwide prevalence and disability associated with osteoporotic fractures. Osteoporos Int 17:1726.

[9] Saffar JL, Sagroun B, De Tessieres C, Makris G. Osteoporotic effect of a high-carbohydrate diet (Keyes 2000) in golden hamsters. Arch Oral Biol 1981;26:393–397.

[10] Tjaderhane L, Larmas M. A high sucrose diet decreases the mechanical strength of bones in growing rats. J Nutr 1998;128:1807–1810.

[11] Tucker KL, Chen H, Hannan MT, et al. Bone mineral density and dietary patterns in older adults: the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Am J Clin Nutr 2002;76:245–252.

[12] Tucker KL, Morita K, Qiao N, et al. Colas, but not other carbonated beverages, are associated with low bone mineral density in older women: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Am J Clin Nutr 2006;84:936–942.

[13] Wyshak G, Frisch RE. Carbonated beverages, dietary calcium, the dietary calcium/phosphorus ratio, and bone fractures in girls and boys. J Adolesc Health 1994;15:210–215.

[14] Hollingbery PW, Bergman EA, Massey LK. Effect of dietary caffeine and aspirin on urinary calcium and hydroxyproline excretion in pre- and postmenopausal women. Fed Proc 1985; 44:1149.

[15] Massey LK, Berg T. Effect of dietary caffeine on urinary mineral excretion in healthy males. Fed Proc 1985; 44:1149.

[16] Bergman EA, Massey LK. Effect of dietary caffeine on urinary calcium in estrogen replete and estrogen depleted women. Fed Proc 1986; 45:373.

[17] Barrett-Connor E, Chang JC, Edelstein SL. Coffee-associated osteoporosis offset by milk consumption. JAMA 1994; 271:280–283.

[18] Rapuri PB, Gallagher JC, Kinyamu HK, Ryschon KL. Caffeine intake increases the rate of bone loss in elderly women and interacts with vitamin D receptor genotypes. Am J Clin Nutr 2001; 74:694–700.

[19] Hernandez-Avila M, Colditz GA, Stampfer MJ, et al. Caffeine, moderate alcohol intake, and risk of fractures of the hip and forearm in middle-aged women. Am J Clin Nutr 1991; 54:157–163.

[20] Zarkadas M, Gougeon-Reyburn R, Marliss EB, et al. Sodium chloride supplementation and urinary calcium excretion in postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr 1989; 50:1088–1094.

[21] Antonios TFT, MacGregor GA. Deleterious effects of salt intake other than effects on blood pressure. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 1995; 22:180–184.

[22] Chan AYS, Poon P, Chan ELP, et al. The effect of high sodium intake on bone mineral content in rats fed a normal calcium or a low calcium diet. Osteoporosis Int 1993; 3:341–344

[23] Devine A, Criddle RA, Dick IM, et al. A longitudinal study of the effect of sodium and calcium intakes on regional bone density in postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr 1995; 62:740–745.

[24] Feskanich D, Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA. Milk, dietary calcium, and bone fractures in women: a 12-year prospective study. Am J Public Health 1997; 87:992–997.


Article by Tom Fisher RN, BA, Nurse Supervisor at Hippocrates Health Institute

The post Natural Ways to Strengthen Bones appeared first on Hippocrates Health Institute.

]]>