To understand why this occurred, they looked at the N-myc gene, a proto-oncogene present, but usually inactive, in all of us. When activated, either by damage or faulty signals, it promotes cancer growth. According to researchers led by Michiaki Murakoshi, alpha-carotene inhibits cancer growth by halting malignant cells in the rest phase of their growth cycles, where they remain until its effects wear off.

Further studies are in progress at Harvard University’s School of Dental Medicine, according to researcher Joel Schwartz, a tumor immunologist, reporting to Science News. His team has found that in addition to suppressing the proto-oncogene, beta-carotene prevents malignant cells from progressing through their normal cycles of growth and cell division. These studies are the first proof to date that carotenoids actually do inhibit cancer. So it’s good health insurance to munch a few carrots or any carotene-rich food every day.

Best Sources of Beta-Carotene

FOOD (3.5 Ounces)

BETA CAROTENE (mg)

Sunflower Green Sprouts

12.9

Dandelion Greens (1 cup cooked)

8.4

Carrots (1 large)

6.6

Sweet Potato (1 medium)

5.9

Cress (3/4 cup cooked)

5.6

Kale (3/4 cup cooked)

5.3

Spinach (1/2 cup cooked)

4.9

Mango (1/2 medium)

2.9

Winter Squash(3/4 cup cooked)

2.4

Cantaloupe (1 slice)

2.0

Apricots (3 medium)

1.6

Broccoli (3/4 cup cooked)

1.5

Romaine Lettuce (10 leaves)

0.8

Asparagus (7 spears)

0.5

Tomato (1 medium)

0.5

Peach (1 large)

0.5

Source: University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter                                                

Vol 9 Issue 3 Page 6

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